Archive | November, 2013

Christmas food gifts-plantain chips, cashews & dried cranberries in coconut, chilli and cinnamon

13 Nov

 

 

Christmas food gifts-plantain chips, cashews & dried cranberries in coconut, chilli and cinnamon

Christmas food gifts-plantain chips, cashews & dried cranberries in coconut, chilli and cinnamon

My lovely neighbour gave me a bag full of plantain today; fresh and green. I racked my brain for ways to use it. I thought of the spiced plantain mash I had at ‘mama’s roadside kitchen’ in st.Lucia or the indian curry my mum would make when we were kids, using her experience of living in Uganda as a child. I asked my friends on twitter and they suggested cake. I didn’t fancy any of these lovely recipes today, for some reason.

In the morning, by boy and I went shopping for women’s undergarments. My normally chatty and excitable child completely freaked out and sobbed loudly in the fitting cubicle and insisted, ‘put a jumper and jacket on mumma, put the clothes on mumma’. He’s not yet two but here we go. So I took him for a walk and stopped at the dried fruits and nuts section which looked festive but blue. Why blue? Anyway, that’s when it struck me.

But I did have a brief period of confusion; which is a more festive nut…the cashew or almond? Cashews are more expensive. Does that make it more special? I do recall my mum sending food parcels of special stuff for my grandmother in India when friends or relatives visited. Mum sent cashews, always. She also sent saffron and chocolate. Now I think back, it’s such a lovely thing to do.

But then, almonds are pretty special also. When we were in st.Lucia we stayed between the majestic pitons, hidden away. We were staying at a resort where the beach sat in a calm little cove and one of the paths along the beach was layer in almond shells. I loves cracking them open to find smooth almonds. It’s lovely that nature can create such a perfect little nut.

I’m actually rather excited about this simple yet addictive recipe. It’s really good. This tropical looking mix is crunchy, sweet, aromatic and there’s a lovely hint of chilli right at the end. It’s delightful. I’ve used agave nectar to sweeten the mix so, healthier than loads of sugar. You have to try it.

Ingredients for two gift containers

One large green plantain
4 tbsp agave nectar
1 tsp chilli flakes
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
3-4 tbsp desiccated coconut
A generous handful of dried cranberries
200g cashew nuts
Oil for frying plantain chips

1 . Heat the oil in a deep pan and in the meantime, take the green skin off the plantain and cut the plantain into 1 cm thick circles with a knife of mandolin.
2. Fry the chips until they are crisp and deepened in colour. You will feel that they are tougher and crisp when you move them with a slotted spoon.
3. Remove the chips onto a kitchen paper and leave them to cool.
4. In a non stick pan, toast the cashew nuts until they are lightly golden before adding the cinnamon and the plantain chips. Mix well.
5. Stir in the chilli flakes, mix again. Then add the agave nectar and the desiccated coconut. Thoroughly mix it all together to make sure the spices and coconut are evenly distributed.
6. Toss in the dried cranberries and mix again.

Allow the mixture to cool completely before packaging it.

This has also been entered into Feel Good Food Challenge hosted by Jibberjabberuk and Victoria at A Kick At The Pantry Door

 

This week I would like to link this to Mark of Javelin Warrior’s Cookin’ W/ Luv Made With Love Mondays,

Om shanti Om- pineapple, rose, ginger and cinnamon lassi

12 Nov

Pineapple, rose, cinnamon and ginger lassi

We saw a glimpse of the sunshine last weekend. We took my boy to feed the cows at the local temple and we walked in the cold, in the sun, wrapped up and smiling. The simple pleasures in life are much more fun when there is light. The sunshine makes such a difference to my mood and every time I say this my husband tells me how small the world is and how we could just go…go somewhere sunnier. Tempting.

The world is small isn’t it. Also at the weekend I was sending a very lovely and friendly magazine editor some insights into where to eat and what to eat in Amritsar. I talked to him about a very humble eatery that is very popular in Amritsar because they serve the best kulcha and lacha paratha. I remember seeing large and flash cars park outside the doors and send their staff in for paratha. I ate the best sheera at the golden temple which was made with the freshest, most luxurious ghee and I ate deep, brown, and earthy curries with a side portion of butter.

All of this was washed down with lassi. Salty, sweet, spiced, of fruity. They we thick and creamy, full of yoghurt and they settled any tingles of heat for the spices in the tummy. They also made me sleepy, which isn’t a bad thing.

With these relaxing thoughts, I needed a fix at the weekend and my foodie friends on twitter suggested lassi. It was mean to me.

Ingredients

300g fresh pineapple peeled and cut into chunks
500ml fresh, natural yoghurt
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
5tbsp rose water
3/4 tsp ginger paste
2 tbsp agave nectar

Method
1. Put the pineapple chunks, ginger, cinnamon and agave nectar in a pan and heat on a low to medium flame until they have softened and you can mash them. Take it off the heat and allow it to cool completely.
2. Mix the yoghurt, rose water,and pineapple chunks and then blitz them together until smooth.
3. Serve cold and add sunshine if possible.

My food onesie; ‘samosa filling’ macaroni and cheese

11 Nov


Samosa filling macaroni cheese

When I am tired and cold (which is pretty much every evening theses days) I want foods that will soothe me into my natural rhythm and it’s not always posh nosh. I am a fan of strange and superb concoctions, novel recipes that get the mind and the taste buds tingling…but when I am feeling this way, you know what I want. I want a hot water bottle, a blanket, cuddles, Mahabharata on the telly ( the only programme I watch these days) and some proper comforting and nostalgic comfort food. This is why I call it my food onsie.

What’s happened to me? Thinking back a few years I never wore my hair up when I was out, wore contact lenses only when socialising and mostly wore make up when I left the house. I went shopping for clothes regularly and knew about what was trending. I watched films and knew what was hot and not. And now?

Now I am cold and tired and I need more sleep. Last week I went to playgroup with snot on my shoulder and I wear leggings way too often. My hair is up because I don’t want it pulled and I wear glasses more than lenses. I wear cosy socks and thought of investing in a slanket (blanket with sleeves). I need sleep and comfort food that tastes hot and moderately spiced and just delicious. That’s it. Talk about the simple things eh?

This one is indulgent and is like eating a samosa in the rain. It just works. The vegetables are simple and easy, just how life should be. The mac is cheesy and the top is crunchy with breadcrumbs and its good. Just how life should be. Let me tell you, you won’t get the munchies after eating this dish…you will sleep well…just as we all should.

Ingredients to serve 4-6

600g macaroni
Half a medium head of cauliflower, cut into florets
75g petit pois
75g sweetcorn kernels
One medium onion, diced
100g green beans, cut into bite sized pieces
5-6 curry leaves
2 green chilies
Salt to taste
3/4 tsp garam masala
1 tsp cumin seeds
2tbsp, vegetable oil for cooking
1/2 tsp turmeric
One medium potato, diced
One medium leek, cut into bite sized chunks
120g mature cheese, grated plus another couple of handfuls for the topping
100g breadcrumbs
1200ml milk
20g butter
4tbsp. Plain flour

Method

1. Boil the macaroni per the packet instructions. Wash and drain when it is cooked and leave it to a side.
2. In the meantime, heat the oil in a pan and add the cumin, turmeric, curry leaves and chilli. Let the seeds sizzle and then add the onion and salt. Sauté until the onion is softened and then add the rest of the vegetables.
3. Mix the vegetables in the oil well and then sprinkle in the garam masala. Cook until the potato is soft enough to pierce. This should take 10-12 minutes.
4. In the meantime, make the cheese sauce by melting the butter and adding the plain flour to make a soft paste. Loosen it up with a bit of oil if needed. Add the milk and whisk on a medium to low flame until the paste is absorbed into the milk. Then add the cheese and whisk lightly and loosely until the sauce thickens. Turn the heat off.
5. Take a deep and long baking tray and spread the macaroni into the tray. Combine it with the cooked vegetables and mic thoroughly. Introduce the cheese sauce and mix again. Sprinkle on the remaining cheese and and then top with the breadcrumbs, evenly.
6. Put the tray under the grill and brown lightly.

Serve hot and you won’t need a hot water bottle. Snooze afterwards if you can, it adds to the effect.

Tangy, sweet, spicy Christmas food gift-tomato, pineapple and cucumber chutney

9 Nov
Tangy, sweet, spicy Christmas food gift-tomato, pineapple and cucumber chutney

Tangy, sweet, spicy Christmas food gift-tomato, pineapple and cucumber chutney

On our houseboat in Kerala we had chef with us, as part of the deal. It was during one of my birthdays and what a way to spend it; lying on a mahogany hammock on the boat looking out at the lush green backwaters and watching birds swoop. I don’t often feel utterly relaxed, but that was a time where I did. I find that when I feel too absorbed in the microscopic elements of life, seeing life from a different angle makes me feel more alive, more grateful and more free.

Kerela house boat
Hammock
Scenary

I could see fluorescent green rice paddies in the distance. I watched small children take a boat, run past a tiny white-painted church so they could get to school. I watched fishermen and people looked happy. I thought about my own social circles, how different people are.

In the morning chef made stacks of hot, fluffy idli (sour steamed little cakes made of fermented rice and lentils) and puri. As a snack he would make banana fritters and steaming hot cardamom tea and just thinking of the dinner makes me feel satiated. I’d ask him to make just a small amount of vegetable rice and maybe one curry…but no. You know what he made? Okra curry, a red lentil dhal, a mixed vegetable Avial, salad, potato fritters and a mango milkshake. I’m not kidding. For two of us. He served us so eagerly and affectionately that the result was, totally truthfully, that my husband and I had to sit up for several hours in bed because we were too full to lie down.

Chef made a spectacular tomato chutney which had some almost-raw bottle gourd in it (dud hi). I scooped excessive amounts of it on my idli in the morning and he smiled at me as I did so. He very kindly taught me how to make it I. The kitchen of the house boat and I gained new admiration for him. The kitchen was small as you’d expect, but it moved! This guy is genius.

I’ve adapted his recipe to Include pineapple for sweetness, and cucumber and not bottle gourd to give a crunchy texture and I’ve kept the tomatoes t give a sweetness and tangy. All in all, this is another sensory play that works fantastically with cheese and bread so you can whip it out for Christmas or dish them out as gusts, as I am doing.

Ingredients to make 4 jars of 150ml size

600g tomatoes skinned
400g pineapple chunks
280ml rice wine vinegar
2 tsp black onion seeds
2 tsp chilli flakes
5-6 curry leaves
1/4 tsp cinnamon
100g caster sugar
One large red onion
2 tbsp oil
2 tsp minced ginger
Salt to taste
Half a large cucumber, cut into bite sized chunks

Cooks tip; to skin the tomatoes pour boiling water into a pan with the tomatoes in. When the skin starts to split, drain the water and wash them in cold water before slipping the skin off.

Tomatoes

 

Method
1. Heat the oil in a pan and add the onion seeds and curry leaves and when the onion seeds crackle add the onions and salt. Sauté the onion for a minute before adding the ginger. Cook until the onion has softened.
2. Pour in the vinegar and sugar and stir it and simmer until the sugar has dissolved.

Simmering

3. Pour the tomatoes, cinnamon and pineapple in and lower the heat and simmer until the juices have dried and the mixture is tacky. It should take about 30minutes.
4. Add the cucumber and cook for a further 4minutes before turning of the heat.

Make sure the jars have been sterilised before you our the cooled chutney in.

Family friendly, hot pink rice and quinoa (Beetroot, butternut squash and Indian spices)

8 Nov

Family friendly, hot pink rice and quinoa (Beetroot, butternut squash and Indian spices)

We all know that there is a relationship between bright and deep coloured food and how alluring we find them and this seems as, if not more true with little people. I showed my toddler some Beetroot other day and thankfully he only had a vest on at the time. ‘Oooh, what’s that mumma’.

I’d caught his interest, clearly. I willed him to bite into a chunk as I let him mess about with it. I recalled a magazine editor telling me that her fussy eater showed no interest in food until he went fishing and caught a fish which he then wanted to eat as he was involved from catching it, to cooking it. Maybe this messy Beetroot was my boys fish?

He did bite into it, but he didn’t ingest any, it ended up in my palm. Great. But it did get me thinking about how I could get him to eat beetroot given that he liked colour. I thought about my visits to Mumbai and being surprised at the inclusion of Beetroot in so many dishes. ‘I thought beetroot is a western vegetable’, I questioned. You can imagine what they thought of that!

There was beetroot in masala sarnies (freaking awesome), beetroot in dosa, beet in chaat, beet in gram flour fritters even. I didn’t see any Beetroot in curries…why haven’t I made one yet? It transpired that Beetroot works pretty well with masala and everyone loves rice don’t they, especially kids.

My recipe today is deep, sweet, spicy and alluring. That just sounded a big like one of those dating adverts didn’t it? Or a blind date catch line. Jokes aside, it’s light, packed, juicy and beautiful.

Ingredients

250g cooked Beetroot, cut into chunks
200g basmati rice, washed
200g butternut squash, peeled and cubed
2 tbsp ground nut oil
1 tsp fennel seeds
1 tsp cumin seeds
One red chilli, finely chopped (optional)
One red onion, finely chopped
1/2 tsp turmeric
1/4 tsp black pepper
Salt to taste d
250g red and white quinoa (I used the merchant gourmet ready to eat pack)
200g basmati

Method
1. Par boil the rice, for about 8minutes until the rice has swelled and needs the starch removed. Wash the rice and drain the water and leave it to a side.
2. Boil the butternut squash until it is soft enough to piece all the way through. Drain and leave it to a side.
3. Heat the oil in a pan and add the cumin seeds, fennel seeds, turmeric and chilli. Allow the seeds to crackle and then add the onion and salt. Sauté until the onions are soft and lightly browned.
4. Stir in the Beetroot and butternut squash and then add the black pepper.
5. Blend the butternut squash and Beetroot smooth and turn the heat down to a flicker.
6. Introduce the rice and the quinoa and gently blend it all together. Cook for a further 6-7 minutes on a low flame until the rice is cooked.

Crispy Mushrooms in a smoked garlic, coconut, cumin, fennel and panko- is it Christmas yet?

7 Nov
Crispy Mushrooms in a smoked garlic, coconut, cumin, fennel and panko

Crispy Mushrooms in a smoked garlic, coconut, cumin, fennel and panko- is it Christmas yet?

One of the many brilliant things about being British and Hindu by religion is that when you feel sad that Diwali is over, you have Christmas to look forward to! I love both festive periods and I am so lucky I am in a place to embrace both. Admittedly the Christmases of my childhood did contain a few samosa and some pav bhajhi. and the pies always had an Indian spiced stuffing, but we did make visits to Santa, sing carols, adorn a tree and watched the queens speech. Most importantly, we spent time together talking and arguing over which Christmas movie to watch.

I was in the supermarket the other day with my boy and as soon as we entered my boy pointed to the ceiling and gasped, ‘where’s the spider gone, where’s the bat gone, mumma where’s the pumpkin…oh no!!’ He was of course referring to the Halloween decorations which had been removed down since our last visit. Whilst I explained that Halloween was over and the bat had flown away and the spider was sleeping, I turned into a Christmas aisle. Already?

Later that day, I saw people posting Christmas coffee holders from popular vendors and my sister-in-law texted me, ‘we need to plan for Christmas’. For real? Are you thinking about Christmas? Are you menu planning…are you counting the days, are you gift shopping and tell the truth, are you dieting?

So here’s one for a special day. These are beautiful crisp, nutty, spicy, a little sweet and they smell wonderfully like spicy and crisp bread. Of course the inside is juicy and moist and have an oozy bite. Don’t substitute the panko (Japanese breadcrumbs) they are fluffier and give much better favour and texture to these beauties. They are pretty impressive, especially when served with my lychee and chilli dipping sauce.

Ingredients to serve 4-6

2 cups of panko breadcrumbs
2 eggs
3/4 cup desiccated coconut
1.5 tsp cumin seeds
1.5 tsp fennel seeds
Salt to taste
Oil for deep-frying
3 tsp smoked garlic powder ( I used one by seasoned pioneers and I found it in the speciality foods section of Sainsbury’s)
200g baby button mushrooms, washed and dried

Method

1. In a shallow bowl or tray combine the panko breadcrumbs, desiccated coconut, smoked garlic granules, cumin, salt and fennel seeds
2. In a separate bowl whisk the eggs lightly and leave to a side until you are ready to use them
3. When the oil is hot, dip the mushrooms in the eggs, shake off the exceeds a d roll them into the crumbly mix and fry them all until they are golden brown.
4. Remove onto kitchen paper and serve hot and crispy.

 

Udon and veg in a miso, sweet potato and herb soup: dinner at Deena’s and a giveaway

6 Nov
Udon and veg in a miso, sweet potato and herb soup: dinner at Deena's and a giveaway

Udon and veg in a miso, sweet potato and herb soup: dinner at Deena’s and a giveaway

U-don with Diwali? I know, really cheesy. After all good festive periods, my tummy is bloated, my skin is still greasy from oily snacks and I have a cold coming on, probably nurtured by exhaustion. I’m missing my family and all the banter and so the way I cope with post-festivity blues is to have dates in the diary with good friends and to laugh, be happy and sleep. I’m still working on the last one.

So tonight my lovely friend Heena and her husband Ash came over for dinner. Heena is lactose intolerant, chilli intolerant and is not eating fattening stuff right now. Oh and we are all vegetarian. Whilst I was sifting through my mind for exciting ideas that fit this criteria, I thought poo. I wanted to try out a new paneer recipe…no. What about that angel hair pasta with ricotta and my secret ingredient…no. I have a very busy monkey that likes to play, ‘I found it’ in my kitchen cupboards empty the contents of an entire cupboard onto the floor. So, the obvious choice of Dhokla, dhal, curry, chappati and rice was not happening. I had 45 minutes to make this meal!

 

In the spirit of the colder season and seeking comfort in cozy socks and friends, I share with you my seasonal warmer that will snuggle you better than a slanket. I am using miso to give an earthy November feel instead of vegetable stock for the soup and using seasonal sweet potato to give the soup sweetness and depth. I have packed the soup with corn cobs, pak choi, oyster mushrooms, green beans and silky noodles. It’s filling, it’s different and it’s actually herby. I’ve added coriander and Thai basil. This one is a joy.

Some great news to share with you! I’m on the tesco finest stage at the BBC Good Food show in London on Saturday 16th November. I will be talking to Lotte Duncan and I’m very excited! The Team have given me a pair of tickets to give away to you and here’s what you have to do. Just post a comment, tell me what you think of this recipe and what your favourite one pot dish is and you could win a pair of tickets to the show! Simple. More details below this recipe.

Print
Ingredients to serve four

4 tbsp miso paste
3tbsp finely chopped Thai basil
30g finely chopped coriander
Two whole cobs of corn chopped into quarters
100g green beans
100g oyster mushrooms, gently torn
A litre of water (use as much water from the sweetcorn)
250g sweet potato, peeled and chopped into cubes
2 pak choi
4 spring onions, chopped into bite sized chunks
125g Udon noodles
2 kaffir lime leaves
(Optional, two red chilies. I didn’t use them today, but I will in future)
2 tbsp toasted sesame oil

Method

1. Prepare the sweet potatoes by boiling them for 8-10 minutes and then blend together after removing the water until it looks like baby food. Leave it to a side.
2. Heat the oil in a deep pain and add the chillies (if you are using them) with the coriander and lime leaves. Sauté for a minute and then add the miso paste, Thai basil, sweet potato. Mix it all well and then then add water.
3. Bring the soup to a simmer and then add all the vegetables and cook for 7-8 minutes.
4. In a separate bowl, cook the udon noodles per the packet instructions and then combine them with the soup.

Serve immediately.

BBC Good Food Show London, Olympia, London, 15 – 17 November 2013

The BBC Good Food Show London is running from 15-17 November at the Olympia in London. To celebrate we have teamed up with the organisers to offer you …. general admission tickets as a fantastic prize! See some of the nation’s favourite TV Shows brought to life with The Great British Bake Off sessions featuring Paul Hollywood and Mary Berry, MasterChef cook offs featuring John Torode and Gregg Wallace and Saturday Kitchen Live sessions featuring James Martin, plus Michel Roux Jr is back live on the Supertheatre and Deena Kakaya on the interview stage sponsored by Tesco finest. Shop from hundreds of exhibitors in the Producers Village and The Great British Bake Off Village and make sure to visit the Pop-Up Restaurant and Street Food Experience to savour some of the best food London has to offer.

Not a winner? To book tickets and for more information on the BBC Good Food Show London please visit bbcgoodfoodshowlondon.com or call 0844 581 1364

Cooking with Herbs

fsf-autumn
Four Seasons Food hosted by Delicieux and Eat Your Veg

Post Diwali Paneer, black bean, chilli French toasties with fig raitha

5 Nov

IMG_4135Post Diwali Paneer, black bean, chilli French toasties with fig raitha
Diwali is over; the fairy lights are off and diya’s have been packed up. We don’t really receive cards anymore otherwise they’d be down too I suppose. The Diwali snacks tubs are still out, but the excitement for them has waned given the over indulgence on them over the last few days. The phones are now quiet and the pretty and bright indian clothes are back in their zip covers and packed up. The skies now sleep in the dark, instead of popping and banging. The hardest bit will be that I will miss my family, the liveliness and the cheerful Diwali banter. The husband goes back to work too. We are back to normal.

So this is where I stop being sad that the festive period is over and take gratitude in the reality, which is a blessing. I was listening to friends and family talk over the past few days and as I grow, the more I realise that it’s so important to keep things in life simple.

We are always chasing. We are always doing. We are always thinking, dreaming, planning and aspiring. All good things, I suppose. If they make you truly happy. Now and in the future. I just often wonder what the point is. The simple things make most people I know happy. Spending time with loved ones, walking, laughing, watching a good movie, eating out, reading a great book, having a soak in the bath. Whatever it is that makes you happy now, do that. Our brains have been conditioned to believe that anger, jealousy, competition are all natural parts of life. But they aren’t. They become parts of our thinking right.

So when I came back from the Diwali celebrations, tired and happy, I flicked on the heaters, stood in front of the fridge and announced that I need a light and tasty meal. It’s part of my gentle recovery from all the feasting over Diwali. I still need something that’s packed with punch, dense but light. If that makes sense. Going straight for the salads feels like a step too far right now. So this is what I concocted. A flavour and texture delight of paneer, black beans, chilli French toasties with a fruity and sweet fig Raitha.

My wonderful sister-in-law is such a light in our lives. She’s an advocate of keeping things simple and the best ideas come to those who keep the clutter away. My sister-in-law is a genius ball of ideas. Honestly, sometimes she will just burst out, ‘ wouldn’t it be good if they invented…’

So amidst my child’s eating refusal, she suggested eggy bread. It’s crunchy and easy eat and taste great. It’s nutritious for a little one too. Of course me being me, I can’t just stop at eggy bread…and my little one loves spice. So I gave him this sarnie without the chillies!

Ingredients for four sandwiches

100g grated paneer
100g black beans
2 green chillies, finely chopped
One red onion, finely chopped
1 tbsp finely chopped coriander
1 tsp chaat masala
1 tsp cumin seeds
1 tsp coriander powder
1/2 cup milk
2 eggs
2 tbsp butter
A little oil to loosen the butter
8 slices of bread

For the Raitha

75ml plain natural yoghurt
3 fresh figs, peeled.
Salt to taste
1/4 tsp coriander powder

Method
1. Combine the grated paneer, black beans, red onion, chaat masala, cumin seeds, coriander powder and green chilies in a bowl and mix well.
2. Combine the eggs and milk in a separate bowl, whisk and keep to aside.
3. Heat half a tablespoon of butter in a non-stick pan and add a little oil to loosen and make sure the butter doesn’t burn. Make a sandwich by placing some of the mixture inside and then cut it half. Hold it to close and dip into the batter. Place it on the pan and let it catch a golden colour before turning it over.
4. To make the raitha, simply combine the yoghurt with the flesh of three figs. Fork it down to a pulpy texture and them add a little coriander powder and a pinch of salt.

Serve immediately and wait for sighs.

For more recipes go to www.deenakakaya.com 

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A Diwali breakfast of courgette and butternut squash savoury gram flour pancakes with a honey and mustard yoghurt dressing – recipes vegetarian

2 Nov

Start the day as you mean to go on.

A Diwali breakfast of courgette and butternut squash gram flour pancakes with a honey and mustard yoghurt dressing

So, I start my day as I mean to go on and a savoury Diwali breakfast is more important that the day before. The whole of the festive period is spent eating. Mithai (indian sweets) , fried samosa, sweet dumplings in a crispy flour case, or pakora or crunchy rice and lentil wheels. So then, it doesn’t make sense to have cereal or toast for breakfast, does it. Have something special and utterly full of flavour  and filling for breakfast on Diwali, of course it should be spicy.I started to think about things that I was grateful for. My good health, my loving family, I’m reasonably smart, I have talents. There were lots of good things that I had seen, experienced and achieved in my life and for that I was grateful. Now, when I wake up and I’m confused about my thoughts…I bring myself to the here and now and think of good things.

Now I’m not a huge fan of butternut squash. I’m not keen on very sweet vegetables. But in this dish it adds moisture and a little sweetness without it being overwhelming. Don’t worry if the pancakes feel very moist inside when to first bite them; that’s all part of the charm. They’re spicy, they’re fluffy, they are moist, deep and lasting. Go on…

If Diwali makes you happy, if talking, smiling, eating, being around loved ones makes you happy…the keep doing it.

Ingredients

For the pancakes

100g grated butternut squash
75g grated courgette
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 tsp minced ginger
1 tsp fennel seeds
1 tsp cumin seeds
salt to taste
2 tsp baking powder
One green chilli, chopped finely
One small red onion, finely diced
100g gram flour
1/2 tsp ground turmeric
200ml water
3-4 tbsp oil for frying

For the dressing

1 tbsp sesame oil
5 curry leaves
One tsp minced ginger
1/2 tsp brown mustard seeds
1/2 tsp ground turmeric
250g whipped Greek yoghurt
1 tbsp honey
1 green chilli

Method.

1. To make the dressing, heat the oil in a non-stick pan and cook the curry leaves and mustard seeds for 1 min. Stir in the chilli, turmeric and ginger, then cook on a low heat for 2-3 mins. Remove from the heat and leave to cool completely. Stir the cooled spice mix into the whipped yogurt along with the honey, then chill until you are ready to serve the meal. Can be made a day ahead.
2. To make the pancakes, combine the courgette, butternut squash, ginger, garlic, chilli, salt and spices together with onion and mix well. Add the gram flour and mix thoroughly before adding the water and combine until the gram flour lumps are removed.
3. On a non stick pan, heat 1-2 tsp oil and add 1/3 cup per pancake and fry until golden brown and then flip it over and repeat.

Serve hot and fresh.

I am joining in with Credit Crunch Munch, hosted this month at Dinner With Crayons  thanks to Fuss Free Flavours and Fab Food 4 All

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