Archive | potato RSS feed for this section

Red pepper and goat’s cheese bites

11 Apr

Crispy, red pepper and goats cheese bites

red pepper and goats cheese bites by Deena Kakaya

red pepper and goats cheese bites by Deena Kakaya

I had a good day on the Friday just gone.  After a week of early starts with the school run and late finishes with work, I took time out on Friday. This doesn’t happen often (in fact it is very rare) despite my husband frequently persuading me about the benefits of ‘down time’.  There is a lot of sense in it; revived creativity, elevated mood, remembering the simple things in life and so contributing towards a heart that is full of gratitude and, it is true, I did feel lighter.

The girls and I had lunch at a friend’s house. We each took a little something with us, but our host did most the cooking and it was all gorgeous. I must have mentioned before that it is seldom that anyone will cook for me, so I feel particularly spoilt when I can sit back and watch (and of course eat).  Just sitting in the sunshine of her kitchen, I looked around at the other three ladies at different stages of life, all with different blessings and challenges and yet all were smiling.

The season of relishing the sunshine on the face, whilst eating picky foods is upon us; there is new hope, renewed energy and baby animals being born. My little friends in the garden (the flowers that visit us every spring) are pepping above the soil now and ready to burst open. Many of them are older than my five-year-old baby and many others have been planted with his help. This is the season of emerging colour and gentle excitement, it is my favourite season. My skirts get a good dusting off and the garden tools come out.  The meals get lighter, more portable and become more of a compilation of bite sized goodies, which is why I thought it timely to share this recipe for crispy red pepper and goats cheese bites; they’re oozy and sweet with cheese and pepper.  They’re mild yet lasting and have generous crunch and depth. They are easy to make, for when you have friends over. I used the remaining roasted red pepper to make a quick and easy harissa, the pairing worked!

Recipe (makes 16 crispy bites)

2 medium sized baking potatoes

100g goats cheese

150g of Cooks & Co roasted red pepper, sliced into bite sized pieces

1 large spring onion, or two medium sized spring onions

1 tsp. cumin seeds

Chilli flakes to taste

Salt to taste

¼ tsp. ground black pepper

50g plain flour

2 medium eggs, lightly whisked with a fork

125g panko breadcrumbs

Vegetable oil for shallow frying

for the full recipe please visit great British chefs

 

 

 

Indo-Thai mango and coconut bhel

5 Oct

Indo-Thai mango and coconut bhel

Two fabulous things happened at the tail end of last week; my husband returned home for a couple of days, after eleven days of business related work in Australia and I found a Riverford fruit and veg box wrapped up and tucked behind my garden gate.

Indo-thai bhel1 by Deena Kakaya

 

Years ago, when my husband made the switch from his role in the pharmaceutical industry to make a living in the field he is so passionate about (magic) I would cry upon his departure for these clustered long-haul trips. After years of listening to him talk about making dreams manifest and how life is so short and it is not worth spending limited moments of breath and potential smiles doing something one is less than passionate about, there was a juxtaposition of,  ‘I want you to LIVE’ and ‘I don’t want to be alone’.

I didn’t like the quiet of the evenings or cooking for one. I didn’t like the ‘filling in’ activities. I didn’t like waking alone or going to sleep with just the telly for company. But look, years on. Who would have thought that I could become accustomed to waving goodbye with a young child on my hip and that the quiet of the evenings would become precious time to prepare for lectures or cookery classes and those textbooks have become me, once again?  Years ago I would find solace in those messages, ‘how are you coping on your own’ and now I see ambition and vision through how much courage I have mustered up in recent years. I have even considered spending a few years abroad.

So the contents of the Riverford fruit and veg box this week made me chuckle because they matched my thoughts of more exotic climes and the will to LIVE. Now, I am sure I have gone on, and on enough about how much of an alphonso fan I am but alas we can’t have these in the UK this year but I was tickled by the delivery of a large and firm mango. I spotted red chillies and red onions, salsa? I could have done yes, but I fancied something sensational and explosive. It is how I want to feel you see.

I am taking a deep breath before I tell you this. Macaroons and chaat. OK. Let me explain. These are the two foods that make my limbs turn to jelly with anticipation and heart skipping joy. Heart-leap-frogging.  I am a girl that does not need to be gifted shoes, give me macaroons and chaat. And if I haven’t told you before, chaat is Indian street food (vegetarian snack) of inordinate amounts of sensual pleasure. The trickles of tamarind chutney and chilli green lip-smacking chutney heighten a fine balance of sweet, sour, crisp, cool, soft and spicy textures. It pops every sense and leaves anyone and everyone hankering for more, more, more.

But, you know me. I can’t just leave it there. I saw this mango and thought Indo-Thai would be absolutely perfumery delight. The mango gives sweet-sharp balance to the aniseed Thai basil. I have used coconut and peanuts for the salty and nutty elements too. This is not an understated dish (I have stressed that enough haven’t I?) it is a full show. New potatoes ensure that you get a soft bite without soggy mess that an ordinary potato can bring and you can get the puffed rice from most supermarkets or Indian grocers. I have used chopped mint and coriander too for a real herby feel. I would definitely recommend getting hold of the chaat masala that is made of peppery black salt, it lifts the dish to a whole new level. Just try it.

for the full recipe head over to great british chefs

Two potato and sweet corn soup with three different garnishes

19 Aug

Two potato and sweet corn soup with three different garnishes

Two potato and sweet corn soup with three different garnishes

I’m sitting amongst the chaos of toys and emails whilst I write this, with my thick cosy socks wrapping my feet and a blanket draped on my legs. I have always felt older than my years you know, always. Eyes a bit bleary and dates a-muddle, it all feels a bit disorderly.

In full sleeved attire and legs well and truly covered I felt a bit of chill as we walked to the pool this morning. I looked forward to sitting in the warm and shallow kid’s pool, albeit with bedlam of squeals and splashing children swishing down the slide that sits in the pool. The pool is not large, so I chuckled that we sat in our costumes relatively close to each other and cooed at our own toddlers and infants but barely exchanged polite greetings towards each other. But it was nice to see so much love in that pool. My boy was happy, ‘you not working in cookery class today, daddy’s not here, but you’re with ME’. I asked him if he was happy, ‘yes, I love you mum, you stay with me’.

Amongst all the disarray of the last three and half years, this has happened. There is colour and some peace. And it tastes good.

Two potato and sweet corn soup with three different garnishes

I held a cookery class on Saturday and one on Sunday and my goodness they were at full capacity, in a gorgeous school in the city that I love (London, of course) and we had people frying, rolling spring rolls, making cashew nut cream…and we had smiles and fun. Can I tell you what I really came away with? A lady told me she was really proud of herself and she thought her curry was better than restaurant quality. Two women hugged and exchanged contact details as they left because they had connected so well. A couple fed each other and held hands because the class was their quality time together. A young pair of people flirted mildly (yes I noticed and sorry if you are reading this, but it was very sweet). A lady who was scared of frying made the best fusion style pakora. Everything ran to time. I was sent emails afterwards with thanks and professionals emailed me telling me that the class is ‘exceptionally good’. I had a lady who had not cooked because her mother and sister were the queens of the kitchen but now she felt like she had dishes to serve her little boy and husband. A young man came away saying, ‘now I can impress my mum’.

Things are beginning to make some sense.

My soup today tells this story. This recipe is inspired by a Columbian recipe for ajiaco and a harmony of deep, Autumnal soothing potatoes (both sweet and fluffy) in a stew-like soup with the promise of brightness with a fresh tomato salsa with coriander, light crème fraiche, and creamy green avocado. I wouldn’t be me if I didn’t spice it up a bit so I have included fennel seeds, cumin seeds and guajillo chillies for a smoky touch. I have also included some mock chicken but you could use tofu. All in all this becomes a healthful and balanced meal. I didn’t need bread on the side; the soup is really filling, fresh and nourishing. With promise.

Two potato and sweet corn soup with three different garnishes

Ingredients to serve 4

For the soup

250g marabel potatoes (or other floury potato suitable for baking or mashing)

250g sweet potato

200g sweet corn (I used tinned)

One large leek, chopped into chunks

2 bay leaves

200g mock chicken/vegetarian chicken/soya chunks/tofu

1 ½ litres of good quality vegetable stock

3 spring onions

3 cloves of garlic, minced

1 tsp. cumin seeds

2 tbsp. rice wine vinegar

1 tsp. fennel seeds

2 guajillo chillies

2 green chillies

2 tbsp. olive oil or butter

For the coriander and tomato salsa

200g ripe red tomatoes, diced

2 cloves of garlic, minced

2 spring onions cut into bite sized chunks

50g coriander, finely chopped

You will also need;

One large ripe avocado cut into slim wedges

4-8 tbsp. crème fraiche

Method

  1. Lightly heat the olive oil or butter and then add the cumin seeds, fennel seeds, bay leaves and green chillies and once the seeds have started to sizzle stir in the marabel potatoes, garlic and spring onions and cook for a minute
  2. Pour in the vegetable stock and rice wine vinegar and bring the soup to a simmer before adding the guajillo chillies
  3. Simmer the soup for ten minutes before adding the leek, sweet corn and sweet potatoes and then cook for a further ten minutes.
  4. In the meantime, prepare the salsa by combining the tomatoes, coriander, spring onions and garlic.
  5. Ladle the soup into bowls and dress them with the garnishes or let the diners do it themselves for added fun.

I am sharing this recipe with Lavendar and Lovage for the cooking with herbs challenge

lavenderandlovage_cooking2

 

 

Roasted sweet potato, fig and goats cheese salad dressed with Thai basil, chilli and green garlic

16 Jul

Roasted sweet potato, fig and goats cheese salad dressed with Thai basil, chilli and green garlic

Initially I thought this salad too simple to share the recipe for, but it’s so frigging good.

Roasted sweet potato, fig and goats cheese salad dressed with Thai basil, chilli and green garlic

Now, I am sure you know about how I have been simplifying my life recently. I have been spending weekends with less fretting about where this is all going and more time discussing the best parks and gastro pubs. The grand plan is less frequently referring to the clutter of attainments and more the sequence of activities the coordination of multiple children around the zoo. My Google searches aren’t so vocation oriented and are more about reincarnation, the key characters of the Mahabharata and people who are evidence of ‘devolution’.

This healthy vegetarian salad does not have anything to do with the feeling I got when I looked at the mirror this morning and the immediate bolt of, ‘oh goodness I look like one of those mothers’. It doesn’t relate to the inner sigh I experienced when I was writing this and felt my thighs cling together unfashionably. It certainly isn’t about wanting to fit into all those pre-career break professional clothes. OK, it is. BUT, it tastes SO frigging good.

Now, green garlic sounds exotic and exciting. It is pretty but it is essentially immature garlic before it separates into cloves and intensifies in flavour. Green, or spring garlic has a mellow and verdant flavour and works perfectly for this salad so don’t be put off by the idea of figs and garlic. The blend of sweet potatoes, aniseed-type flavoured Thai basil, creamy goat’s cheese and fleshy figs, there is even an even amount of lime to bring it all together…it’s almost too pleasurable. I am actually not kidding. I’m not…

Roasted sweet potato, fig and goats cheese salad dressed with Thai basil, chilli and green garlic

Ingredients

800g sweet potato, peeled cut into wedges

The juice of two limes

Half a bulb of green garlic

One large chilli, finely chopped

Salt to taste

Oil for roasting the potatoes

4 fresh figs cut into wedges, roughly 6 pieces per fig

65g of goat’s cheese

1 tbsp. sesame oil

25g Thai basil, shredded

Method

  1. Coat the wedges lightly in oil and roast them at 200 degrees for 25-30 minutes until they are crisp but definitely soft on the inside.
  2. To make the dressing heat the sesame oil and then add the chilli and garlic and sauté just until the garlic softens but don’t let it brown. Turn off the heat and add the lime juice and salt.
  3. Combine the roasted sweet potatoes, shredded basil and the dressing with the figs and dots of the goat’s cheese.
  4. Serve immediately.

I am sharing this recipe with Lavendar and Lovage for the cooking with herbs challenge

lavenderandlovage_cooking2

Gruyere and buttermilk polenta topped with chaat mushrooms and new potatoes- Switzerland inspired recipe for World Cup 2014

4 Jul

Gruyere and buttermilk polenta topped with chaat mushrooms and new potatoes

It was a toss between a silky Swiss cheese fondue inside a small and round harlequin squash, or cheesy, creamy polenta. Just imagine; creamy, oozing and salty cheese mingling with sweet and light squash that has become so tender that you could scoop it out with a spoon and slip in into your mouth for taste bud ecstasy! OR it’s the creamy, smooth, golden polenta with a light sour note from the buttermilk that’s in perfect harmony with the even and perfectly pronounced Gruyere.  Then this dreamy polenta is topped with light, peppery, spiked, lemony, cumin spiced exotic mushrooms.  It’s a tough life isn’t it, when you have such hard choices to make.

Gruyere and buttermilk polenta topped with chaat mushrooms and new potatoes

When I was asked to prepare a Switzerland inspired recipe as part of the world cup 2014 excitement my mind raced between potatoes, cheese, chocolate and bircher muesli. After visiting three supermarkets in search of the squash (which proved a fun adventure for my two year old, who reminded me of that questionable adventure based TV show- ‘The crystal maze’) there was none of the squash. At the same time I thought I had better not tarnish the efforts I have been making to eat leaner foods this summer and it is probably wise to limit myself on the cheese. To be honest, a little gruyere goes a long way, so you won’t feel that you are missing out by eating cheese and cream for dinner.

Chaat masala is pungent Indian spice and definitely not from Switzerland, but then I wouldn’t be me if I didn’t mix it up a bit, right?  It is a masala that is peppery, salty and spiky as it contains black salt. The smell isn’t so endearing but don’t let that put you off, it lifts the mushrooms to a whole new level. You will find it in most Asian Grocers and even some larger supermarkets.

Gruyere and buttermilk polenta topped with chaat mushrooms and new potatoes

for the full recipe head over to Great British chefs

Miso-tamarind roasted potatoes wedges with locally sourced, garden salad items

6 Jun

Miso-tamarind roasted potatoes wedges with locally sourced, garden salad items

I tasted cucumber flowers yesterday and they were a joy. See how I got straight into it today?

Miso-tamarind roasted potatoes wedges with locally sourced, garden salad items

 

They looked so pretty but what surprised me the most was the intense cucumber flavour of the stem. I was very spoilt at the London produce show. My toddler and I were picked up so that we could travel into town and along the way my boy remembered which roundabouts led to the oriental supermarket and which ones to London zoo. His childhood is so different to how mine was.  He knows his spices, including mixes like ras-el-hanout and he is just two.   Anyway, as I arrived at the Grosvenor house hotel there was a wonderfully quiet area where we were shown fabulous produce such as tomatina, purple carrots, red oxtail, pea shoots, wonderfully juicy asparagus, salad fennel and I took home some salty, shrub-like okahijiki, warm pinks steam radish, pepper salad fennel and some sea buckshorn! Oh and I was also given Valentine Warner’s new book, ‘what to eat next’.

We were given a master class and they made the most superb salad with simple ingredients from the collection above and lightly dressed with sharpness and oil but you know simple and fresh ingredients show off lots, and quite rightly too. The funny thing is, that whilst I was nibbling away at natures best stuff and chatting to fellow foodies about lifestyle choices such as ecological household items, living near farms and eating locally sourced eggs, bread and walking in the fields or even building eco-friendly homes…it reminded me of how each choice I make on a daily basis affects my body. Someone I know moved to the Cotswolds to nurture their family away from London, and you know I love London but there is something to this isn’t there.  I love being outdoors, fresh air, picking my own fruit and veg and then returning with bundles of fresh stuff to cook or freeze. What a life. Far cry from the underground and shopping centres of the city eh?

Miso-tamarind roasted potatoes wedges with locally sourced, garden salad items

I couldn’t let all that fresh and beautifully wrapped stuff that still smelt of the garden go to waste so the very next day I made this salad and I think it looks pretty. But let’s move onto those miso-tamarind roasted potatoes before I pop. They are really very, ‘oh my goodness’. I think miso is fabulous for its deeply mellow and gentle tones that are lasting and ‘brown’. Tamarind is spiky, tangy, sweet and sharp in a tantalising way. I wouldn’t have imagined them tasting good together but they REALLY do. Try it. (Oh and serve with a few dollops of garlic mayonnaise).

Miso-tamarind roasted potatoes wedges with locally sourced, garden salad items

Ingredients to serve 2

500g king Edward potatoes

4 tbsp. miso paste

2 tbsp. tamarind chutney

2 tbsp. oil

A few dabs of garlic mayonnaise

My salad had in it;

–          ½ cup of petit poi’s

–          8 spears of asparagus

–          A handful of Okahijiki

–          5-6 radish shaved or very thinly sliced

–          2-3 baby beetroot

Method

  1. Cut the potatoes into thick wedges and then boil them (skin on) for 7-8 minutes or until barely tender
  2. Drain the potatoes and let them cool and dry completely.
  3. In a large bowl mix the potatoes with the miso, tamarind chutney and oil and toss them all until there is even coverage.
  4. Roast the potatoes in the oven at 180 degrees until they are crisp and sticky brown.
  5. To make the salad simmer the asparagus, beet, peas for approximately 4-5 minutes and then drain them.
  6. Plate the salad and the potatoes and serve with garlic mayonnaise.

eat your greens logo

 

Extra Veg Badge

%d bloggers like this: