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Steamed kofta of spinach and paneer in a roasted red pepper gravy

25 Oct

Steamed kofta of spinach and paneer in a roasted red pepper gravy

Is it just me or are people less obsessed with being thin these days? Is it my age (thirties), where people grow into themselves more, or is it my life stage (mum of toddler and prefer sleep, family time, me-time and just some food over the less necessary stuff)? I don’t know but mostly, people say they need to lose weight but eat the brownie anyway, right? I made some a really gorgeous batch the other day with saffron, rose, cardamom and pistachio and nobody said no.

Steamed kofta of spinach and paneer in a roasted red pepper gravy by Deena Kakaya

However, my body has a way of telling me that I need to be kinder to it and right now; I have gone off my food (as in the taste rather than eating itself). If you have ever watched a cheesy television serial and I am old enough to admit to recalling the crashing sounds and multiple replays of dramatic scenes in Dallas (and every Bollywood serial I come across) then this is what is playing in my mind right now. I, Deena, have gone off the tastes in my food.

At first I thought it was the onset of a cold. But it didn’t appear. Then I thought perhaps it is just over-working and exhaustion. But then I realised that I do feel hunger, it is just that I am not enjoying eating so much. I want to feel the thrill. But I am not.

SO, I have surmised that there are many culprits to this condition of mine; exhaustion, A LOT of cooking recently (maybe too much of my own cooking), overindulgence and heavy tastes, eating more functionally than socially (a lot of eating alone or in a desperate rush). Explains a lot doesn’t it?

You know I have been putting myself into solution mode more and more these days and not focusing on the problems, ‘think solutions, not problems’ – chant, chant, chant. My solution is this steamed kofta of spinach and paneer in light and easy roasted red pepper gravy. It is the curry that thinks it is naughty, but really is quite virtuous. Deceptively simple, ridiculously soothing and fun to eat too! I like that I want to get my fingers into them, but should really wait for the gravy to join the kofta. Let me know if you do a better job at waiting to scoff the lot together, won’t you.

 

for the full recipe head over to great british chefs

Corn on the cob roasted in homemade hoisin sauce

23 Sep

Last weekend felt like a weekend from the yester-summers, with a few subtle differences.

Corn on the cob roasted in homemade hoisin sauce  by Deena Kakaya

We attended a wedding near where we live and I do love a wedding.  As my husband and I fussed with car parking botches before our arrival at the wedding, thanks to faulty ticket machines and lengthy queues of cars filled with sari’s and gifts and then of course a toddler who unquestionably did not agree on how handsome he looked in the suit jacket and smart shirt, I sighed and smiled that this is all part of the happy mayhem with the background tune of, “I can’t like these clothes mumma, I don’t look brilliant.”

As we entered the wedding venue soft romantic music played to a quietly seated and orderly congregation of guests, not like the chattering sprawl my aunts and mum mingled between during my childhood. The priest spoke in soothing, professional and gentle tones, rather than the more directive and stressed tone I remembered from back in the day. The couple looked lovingly at each other, not tensed or fatigued. My cousins and I, who used to chase each other and chatter on in weddings as kids now we entertained our own in the corridors so as not to disturb the silence of the audience. We attempted to orchestrate pictures of the kids but alas, they just wanted to run, as we had once done. Luckily for the collective team of under 5’s the wedding was over in a couple of hours whereas in our day, they were full day affairs that rarely ran to time.

After the wedding my cousins, a few of our parents and of course all the kiddies came back to ours and we had a spray of happy chaos. A crawling baby, toddlers tugging over toys, grandfathers on strawberry picking special-assignments with little super-heroes and squeals on slides and swings. We had pasta and Khichdi and even roasted potatoes all over the house mingling with crisps and grapes. Nappies, spoons and splishing drinks generating curious scents and sounds and a few of us admitted that feeding tired and excitable kiddies was something we were dreading today.

Nobody wanted the Khichdi, or the vegetables, or the pasta or the potatoes but there is one vegetable that everyone agreed on (and this, amidst happy pandemonium is relief). That is corn.

http://www.greatbritishchefs.com/community/corn-roasted-hoisin-sauce-recipe

I am not sure whether it’s the independence element of grabbing corn and just going at the juicy kernels or the cave person freedom. Is it the juicy sweetness or just the easy pleasure? I don’t know but what I do know is that Riverford sent me the freshest and most untainted corn this week in my vegbox and not a single kernel of corn was bruised or damaged. Utterly in season, fresh and golden juicy gorgeousness was in my box and I wanted to do it justice.

Fresh and good quality corn like the stuff I received is sweet and loudly so. To balance the sweetness I whipped up some homemade hoisin sauce which includes salty soy sauce and nutty peanut butter, a bit of chilli and garlic…so you see all the flavours balance so well and it’s such a joy to eat corn sticky and bold in flavour. Go on, be happy.

for the full recipe head over to great british chefs

Home-made plum, star anise and amoretti ice cream

4 Sep

Home-made plum, star anise and amoretti ice cream

I am hanging on to summer. Well, sort of.

Home-made plum, star anise and amoretti ice cream

As I walked (rather than take the car) to pick up ingredients today with the boy in the buggy I sniffled lightly as I thought of all the work I have pending. Exam season is near, but it’s still summer isn’t it because there is still a week before it all kicks off. A whole week. I looked down at my jumper; well at least it has a floral print on it eh? And you know the menu for my upcoming cookery class has kale included, maybe I should just give in.

I mean there is even back-to-school stuff in the shops and the swimming pool is already quieter for all the children are screaming in playgrounds now. There is more traffic building up on the roads and the trampoline in the garden is filling up with rain water. I am still making the season’s last visits to the zoo and well, making ice cream.

So when the chap from Riverford tucked a box of seasonal jewels near my garden with a wrapper l on it and I saw it as I arrived home, my boy and turned our glances away from the wilting flowers and drying rose bushes to grab it and see because we have learned after a few deliveries that the quality of the fruit and vegetables we get is absolutely outstanding. Here is the thing, with no word of exaggeration. The corn we got this week is probably some of the best corn we have eaten in years. Years! I also got a perfectly sweet-tart and sunny looking plums with which I have struck a deal with the season-Gods. They bestow these beauties and I pretend it is still summer by adding a touch of exotic and aniseed-sexy star anise and I wouldn’t be me if I didn’t create a little Asian-Italian fusion with the amoretti biscuits. Maybe I shouldn’t say this, but I will. This ice-cream is out of this world. It is sensational. You have to do it. The creaminess is exquisite and definitely not bashful. The spice is bold and the plums, they are tantalisingly sensual.

for the full recipe head over to great british chefs

fsf-autumn

I am sharing this recipe with Eat your Veg and Delicieux for the four seasons challenge

Raspberry, chia, quark and peanut butter lollies

26 Aug

Raspberry, chia, quark and peanut butter lollies

They keep telling me that kids are either fruit-lovers or more at ease with vegetables and I am not quite sure that I believe them. I am one of those mothers that looks over at the lunch boxes of other toddlers in cafes or at the zoo and I always see sandwiches (which my child won’t eat), some carrot and cucumber sticks (we have some joy there) and always berries and grapes and I have theories on why my toddler is so disinterested in fruit but none of them are proven.

raspberry chia peanut lolly

My first theory is that when I was pregnant I was quite cautious of developing gestational diabetes as I come from a family of diabetics and so I followed a low GI diet pretty well and cut back the fruits and sugar. Perhaps that’s why my toddler will reject the chocolate brownie and go for the garlic cracker? But then I did eat a lot of cake when I was nursing. A LOT.

My second theory is that he simply takes after me in yet another way-I am definitely a vegetable person and that sounds like a silly thing to say about a vegetarian doesn’t it? But I do know vegetarian folk who get by without green stuff and lacking in pulses and lentils in their diets. I don’t know if taste buds are genetically influenced but if any of you do know, please do tell me!

My third theory is that maybe I just don’t eat enough fruit and consequently he needs more exposure? Well it is a good job then that the wonderful family at Riverford sent me a huge box of the most special and glorious fruits and vegetables. They look positively bulging with vitality and goodness and thankfully my toddler gets as excited about the delivery and washing all the lightly soiled vegetables as I do. This time he even took a bit of interest in Riverford’s perfectly formed and bouncing raspberries…but not enough to try them until of course we made these lollies for grown-ups (that kids seem to love too).

I have no idea why the raspberries were more appealing in a lolly but I witnessed the magic of fruit licking and it was one of those moments that just happens so swiftly and unexpectedly that the breath is held in case the moment passes before it is been beheld. Well anyway, poetic stuff aside, there was FRUIT licking.

I soaked the chia seeds in rose water and if you haven’t use chia seeds before they are nutty and silky-slippery. They swell lots when they come into contact with liquid and take on the flavour of whatever they are soaked in, you could use apple juice for instance.

The quark is lean and a very much healthier alternative to ice cream and is creamier than yoghurt. Peanut butter just works. It just does.

For the full recipe head over to great british chefsRaspberry, chia, quark and peanut butter lollies by Deena Kakaya

Two potato and sweet corn soup with three different garnishes

19 Aug

Two potato and sweet corn soup with three different garnishes

Two potato and sweet corn soup with three different garnishes

I’m sitting amongst the chaos of toys and emails whilst I write this, with my thick cosy socks wrapping my feet and a blanket draped on my legs. I have always felt older than my years you know, always. Eyes a bit bleary and dates a-muddle, it all feels a bit disorderly.

In full sleeved attire and legs well and truly covered I felt a bit of chill as we walked to the pool this morning. I looked forward to sitting in the warm and shallow kid’s pool, albeit with bedlam of squeals and splashing children swishing down the slide that sits in the pool. The pool is not large, so I chuckled that we sat in our costumes relatively close to each other and cooed at our own toddlers and infants but barely exchanged polite greetings towards each other. But it was nice to see so much love in that pool. My boy was happy, ‘you not working in cookery class today, daddy’s not here, but you’re with ME’. I asked him if he was happy, ‘yes, I love you mum, you stay with me’.

Amongst all the disarray of the last three and half years, this has happened. There is colour and some peace. And it tastes good.

Two potato and sweet corn soup with three different garnishes

I held a cookery class on Saturday and one on Sunday and my goodness they were at full capacity, in a gorgeous school in the city that I love (London, of course) and we had people frying, rolling spring rolls, making cashew nut cream…and we had smiles and fun. Can I tell you what I really came away with? A lady told me she was really proud of herself and she thought her curry was better than restaurant quality. Two women hugged and exchanged contact details as they left because they had connected so well. A couple fed each other and held hands because the class was their quality time together. A young pair of people flirted mildly (yes I noticed and sorry if you are reading this, but it was very sweet). A lady who was scared of frying made the best fusion style pakora. Everything ran to time. I was sent emails afterwards with thanks and professionals emailed me telling me that the class is ‘exceptionally good’. I had a lady who had not cooked because her mother and sister were the queens of the kitchen but now she felt like she had dishes to serve her little boy and husband. A young man came away saying, ‘now I can impress my mum’.

Things are beginning to make some sense.

My soup today tells this story. This recipe is inspired by a Columbian recipe for ajiaco and a harmony of deep, Autumnal soothing potatoes (both sweet and fluffy) in a stew-like soup with the promise of brightness with a fresh tomato salsa with coriander, light crème fraiche, and creamy green avocado. I wouldn’t be me if I didn’t spice it up a bit so I have included fennel seeds, cumin seeds and guajillo chillies for a smoky touch. I have also included some mock chicken but you could use tofu. All in all this becomes a healthful and balanced meal. I didn’t need bread on the side; the soup is really filling, fresh and nourishing. With promise.

Two potato and sweet corn soup with three different garnishes

Ingredients to serve 4

For the soup

250g marabel potatoes (or other floury potato suitable for baking or mashing)

250g sweet potato

200g sweet corn (I used tinned)

One large leek, chopped into chunks

2 bay leaves

200g mock chicken/vegetarian chicken/soya chunks/tofu

1 ½ litres of good quality vegetable stock

3 spring onions

3 cloves of garlic, minced

1 tsp. cumin seeds

2 tbsp. rice wine vinegar

1 tsp. fennel seeds

2 guajillo chillies

2 green chillies

2 tbsp. olive oil or butter

For the coriander and tomato salsa

200g ripe red tomatoes, diced

2 cloves of garlic, minced

2 spring onions cut into bite sized chunks

50g coriander, finely chopped

You will also need;

One large ripe avocado cut into slim wedges

4-8 tbsp. crème fraiche

Method

  1. Lightly heat the olive oil or butter and then add the cumin seeds, fennel seeds, bay leaves and green chillies and once the seeds have started to sizzle stir in the marabel potatoes, garlic and spring onions and cook for a minute
  2. Pour in the vegetable stock and rice wine vinegar and bring the soup to a simmer before adding the guajillo chillies
  3. Simmer the soup for ten minutes before adding the leek, sweet corn and sweet potatoes and then cook for a further ten minutes.
  4. In the meantime, prepare the salsa by combining the tomatoes, coriander, spring onions and garlic.
  5. Ladle the soup into bowls and dress them with the garnishes or let the diners do it themselves for added fun.

I am sharing this recipe with Lavendar and Lovage for the cooking with herbs challenge

lavenderandlovage_cooking2

 

 

Roasted carrot, mung bean, Quinoa and tomato salad in a miso-masala dressing

28 Jul

Roasted carrot, mung bean, Quinoa and tomato salad in a miso-masala dressing

It was far too hot to go out today and that’s not something I often say and for some reason my toddler has a definite leaning towards traditionally boyish ways.  I never pushed cars, the solar system or action toys to him, in fact I have offered his cousins dolls and teddies for him to play with but there is certainly no interest. In the same tune, he refuses to let me tie his sweeping hair back in this hotness and would rather have his hair stick in clumps around his busy little face.

Roasted carrot, mung bean, Quinoa and tomato salad in a miso-masala dressing

Unlike my toddler I don’t much feel like rushing around and the absolute last thing I wanted to do is stand over bubbling pots of simmering concoctions in this heat. I am also conscious that this autumn brings changes in life where I need to feel my best and so I need to eat the best. Cue my salad of sweet roasted carrots, nutty pink (paprika and turmeric stained) Quinoa, deep and clean mung beans and juicy tomatoes and wrapped up in an umami style miso dressing spiked with coriander powder, cumin powder, chilli and curry leaves. Well, I wouldn’t be me if I didn’t right?

So, instead of growing irritable (and in calories from customary ice-cream eating) in the park with newly holidaying kiddies galore and lugging around drinks, sun cream, hats and changes of clothes we washed mountains lightly soiled (it is muck and clover not artificial soluble fertilizer so we got messy) organic vegetables from Riverford. I stood my boy at the sink and we chatted over the washing of gigantic and crisp lettuce leaves, shiny and even courgette, huge and bulbous spring onions, feathery-headed carrots (apparently Rory the rabbit loves them) and even broad beans, which we ate raw (shhh). I have to say, the flavors of the veg on their own are intense and a reminder that vegetables really don’t have to be a side-dish. The carrots are the star of this dish, just look at them…intense in their roasted skins. A lot of people throw away the feathery greens but for goodness sake keep them! They add fabulous texture to a salad and unsurprisingly, taste very carroty.

This is not posh nosh, but the quality and balance is there and you know, just making this salad with my boy has been so enjoyable and enriching.

For the full recipe, head over to great British chefs.

Roasted carrot, mung bean, Quinoa and tomato salad in a miso-masala dressing

This is a sponsored post but any views expressed are my own.

Roasted sweet potato, fig and goats cheese salad dressed with Thai basil, chilli and green garlic

16 Jul

Roasted sweet potato, fig and goats cheese salad dressed with Thai basil, chilli and green garlic

Initially I thought this salad too simple to share the recipe for, but it’s so frigging good.

Roasted sweet potato, fig and goats cheese salad dressed with Thai basil, chilli and green garlic

Now, I am sure you know about how I have been simplifying my life recently. I have been spending weekends with less fretting about where this is all going and more time discussing the best parks and gastro pubs. The grand plan is less frequently referring to the clutter of attainments and more the sequence of activities the coordination of multiple children around the zoo. My Google searches aren’t so vocation oriented and are more about reincarnation, the key characters of the Mahabharata and people who are evidence of ‘devolution’.

This healthy vegetarian salad does not have anything to do with the feeling I got when I looked at the mirror this morning and the immediate bolt of, ‘oh goodness I look like one of those mothers’. It doesn’t relate to the inner sigh I experienced when I was writing this and felt my thighs cling together unfashionably. It certainly isn’t about wanting to fit into all those pre-career break professional clothes. OK, it is. BUT, it tastes SO frigging good.

Now, green garlic sounds exotic and exciting. It is pretty but it is essentially immature garlic before it separates into cloves and intensifies in flavour. Green, or spring garlic has a mellow and verdant flavour and works perfectly for this salad so don’t be put off by the idea of figs and garlic. The blend of sweet potatoes, aniseed-type flavoured Thai basil, creamy goat’s cheese and fleshy figs, there is even an even amount of lime to bring it all together…it’s almost too pleasurable. I am actually not kidding. I’m not…

Roasted sweet potato, fig and goats cheese salad dressed with Thai basil, chilli and green garlic

Ingredients

800g sweet potato, peeled cut into wedges

The juice of two limes

Half a bulb of green garlic

One large chilli, finely chopped

Salt to taste

Oil for roasting the potatoes

4 fresh figs cut into wedges, roughly 6 pieces per fig

65g of goat’s cheese

1 tbsp. sesame oil

25g Thai basil, shredded

Method

  1. Coat the wedges lightly in oil and roast them at 200 degrees for 25-30 minutes until they are crisp but definitely soft on the inside.
  2. To make the dressing heat the sesame oil and then add the chilli and garlic and sauté just until the garlic softens but don’t let it brown. Turn off the heat and add the lime juice and salt.
  3. Combine the roasted sweet potatoes, shredded basil and the dressing with the figs and dots of the goat’s cheese.
  4. Serve immediately.

I am sharing this recipe with Lavendar and Lovage for the cooking with herbs challenge

lavenderandlovage_cooking2

Coconut milk, coriander and jalapeno marinated Halloumi with figs

9 Jul

Coconut milk, coriander and jalapeno marinated Halloumi with figs

Coconut milk, coriander and jalapeno marinated Halloumi with figs

I have had a fuzzy couple of weeks, but bizarrely there has been some good to come out of this fog.

I have been in limbo between throat infection and glandular fever. I, the immunity hero who only suffered a single bout of flu in 5 years (it ended up being swine flu) have been down with more illnesses in the last two years than in the first entire lifetime. I blame serious exhaustion.

I fell asleep on the sofa today, before lunchtime, for an entire 13 minutes.  I know some of you are thinking, ‘I wish I could have a quick nap in the middle of the day’ but wait.  I have been known to knock out when I am not supposed to. I have done in lectures, even the postgraduate ones that were being paid for by the workplace at the risk of it being fed back to my employers, but I blame Saturday lectures for that. I have fallen asleep in meetings at work, especially the ones about the IT infrastructure, even when it concerned my pricing policies, but I blame the dimly lit rooms for that. I have fallen asleep in the toilets at work (I closed the lid first) and have  been late for meetings. Not much that I can blame for that one. It goes without saying that I have fallen asleep on the trains but surprisingly I have never missed my station.

But none of these badly-timed snoozing incidences have caused the chaos that 13 minutes in front of the telly, in my own living room caused today.

In the 13 minutes (with cartoons on the TV) my Tasmanian devil drew one the wall next to the bay window, tore up my recipe notes, emptied an entire kitchen cupboard onto the floor, filled up the tall kitchen bin with items that it certainly did not want to eat, unraveled two toilet rolls onto the cloakroom floor and every single toy car that my boy owns was strewn around the living room floor.

Stay awake. Stay awake. Stay awake. Stay awake.

Coconut is refreshing and quenching and smells so lifting and holiday like. I need a holiday, wonder if that will happen this lifetime? Coriander, green and renewing and with the jalapeno, it is so balanced. The fleshy figs are gentle and some say they are an aphrodisiac but clearly the mess-clearing isn’t, see…balance. If there is ever a ‘wake-up’ dish, it’s this one.

Coconut milk, coriander and jalapeno marinated Halloumi with figs

Ingredients to serve 2

A can of coconut milk

30g coriander, coarsely chopped

2 tbsp. chopped jalapeno peppers

1 tsp. galangal puree

2 figs, sliced

About 200g Halloumi, cut into 8 slices

Method

  1. Blitz the coriander and jalapenos together and mix the puree with the coconut milk and the galangal
  2. Combine the spiced coconut milk with the sliced Halloumi and keep it in the fridge for a couple of hours
  3. Once marinated, place the Halloumi on a hot non-stick pan with roughly half the coconut milk mixture and cook until the juices have dried and the Halloumi has browned. Then flip the Halloumi over, add the other half of the spiced coconut milk and brown again
  4. Serve hot with the figs and some of the left over coconut milk paste as a dressing.

I am sharing this recipe with Lavendar and Lovage for the cooking with herbs challenge

lavenderandlovage_cooking2

 

Gruyere and buttermilk polenta topped with chaat mushrooms and new potatoes- Switzerland inspired recipe for World Cup 2014

4 Jul

Gruyere and buttermilk polenta topped with chaat mushrooms and new potatoes

It was a toss between a silky Swiss cheese fondue inside a small and round harlequin squash, or cheesy, creamy polenta. Just imagine; creamy, oozing and salty cheese mingling with sweet and light squash that has become so tender that you could scoop it out with a spoon and slip in into your mouth for taste bud ecstasy! OR it’s the creamy, smooth, golden polenta with a light sour note from the buttermilk that’s in perfect harmony with the even and perfectly pronounced Gruyere.  Then this dreamy polenta is topped with light, peppery, spiked, lemony, cumin spiced exotic mushrooms.  It’s a tough life isn’t it, when you have such hard choices to make.

Gruyere and buttermilk polenta topped with chaat mushrooms and new potatoes

When I was asked to prepare a Switzerland inspired recipe as part of the world cup 2014 excitement my mind raced between potatoes, cheese, chocolate and bircher muesli. After visiting three supermarkets in search of the squash (which proved a fun adventure for my two year old, who reminded me of that questionable adventure based TV show- ‘The crystal maze’) there was none of the squash. At the same time I thought I had better not tarnish the efforts I have been making to eat leaner foods this summer and it is probably wise to limit myself on the cheese. To be honest, a little gruyere goes a long way, so you won’t feel that you are missing out by eating cheese and cream for dinner.

Chaat masala is pungent Indian spice and definitely not from Switzerland, but then I wouldn’t be me if I didn’t mix it up a bit, right?  It is a masala that is peppery, salty and spiky as it contains black salt. The smell isn’t so endearing but don’t let that put you off, it lifts the mushrooms to a whole new level. You will find it in most Asian Grocers and even some larger supermarkets.

Gruyere and buttermilk polenta topped with chaat mushrooms and new potatoes

for the full recipe head over to Great British chefs

Tofu stuffed with toasted sesame, almonds, sorrel and chili

1 Jul

Tofu stuffed with toasted sesame, almonds, sorrel and chili

I taught a cookery class the other day and after I had introduced the dishes a gentleman who told me knew the general drill asked, “So where is the protein”. As I explained where the protein was and how in a vegetarian diet that is varied and borrows recipe from the world, there is plenty of delicious and nutritious variety…look at the pulses, tofu, lentils…

You know what followed don’t you? Yes, there was an upheaval of the ‘tofu is dull and sanctimonious’ debate.

Tofu stuffed with toasted sesame, almonds, sorrel and chili
1. Tofu is bland
a. A blank canvas more like! Is a potato bland? Well of course it is if you just boil it and eat it on its own. Tofu is inviting you to soak it, marinade it, dress it, bake it, fry it, scramble it; for goodness sake just do something to it. Nobody is asking you to eat naked slivers of spongy pointlessness as your main meal. Have you ever put it in a curry? It soaks up the juices and then releases them in succulent and generous bursts in each mouthful. Have you ever marinated it? It catches essences like a long-lost embrace. Have you scrambled it with some spices and veg-you won’t miss the egg!
2. Tofu is expensive
a. Is a block of tofu more expensive than a steak or chicken for a family dinner?
3. Tofu mushes up too quickly
a. Wrap it up in kitchen paper and leave it to stand for a 15 minutes if you are using firm tofu to shallow fry or in a curry and if you are using silken tofu then add them into a stock rather than when stir-frying vegetables.
4. I can just eat meat for the protein
a. Yes of course. Tofu is an protein source for a) those want to follow a vegetarian or vegan diet b) those who cutting down on meat to enjoy health benefits c) those who want to address food shortages in the developing world d) those who want to positively influence the environment
5. I don’t like the texture of tofu
a. Not sure I would be if I just ate it as it is. I like it shallow fried and then spiced and doused with soy, rice wine vinegar and chili. When I have friends over I sometimes deep fry it and they became crisp with a lovely chewiness inside and I add them to noodle soups and sometimes we assemble our own. I make, Vietnamese spring rolls where I use tofu in a slippery bite, and then there are kofta, which are spongy and juicy. Do you like scrambled eggs? Then you will like spiced and scrambled tofu in a pitta or wrap.

Funnily enough when I asked for feedback half the group asked for another class demonstrating different techniques on preparing and cooking tofu. Well…

You could use this recipe on your next barbecue and here a few of my other recipes for tofu if you haven’t already seen them

crispy chaat masala tofu salad with tamarind chutney and yogurt dip

tandoori tofu and cauliflower tacos

hot and spicy tofu, alfalfa sprouts and asparagus Vietnamese spring rolls

soy-masala tofu, quinoa, avocado and mozzarella salad

Ingredients
One block of firm tofu (I used the cauldron pack)
20g sesame seeds
60g almonds
2 tbsp. agave nectar
One large red chilli, finely chopped
1 tbsp. sesame oil
Salt to taste
A few dashes of your favorite chili sauce
40g sorrel leaves
For the dressing
5 tbsp. light soy sauce
2 tbsp. rice wine vinegar
2 tsp. chili oil
Method
1. Wrap the tofu in kitchen paper and rest it until the excess moisture has been soaked up.
2. Toast the almonds and sesame seeds until they lightly brown and the seeds begin to pop before taking them off the heat.
3. Place the sesame seeds, almonds, sorrel, agave, oil, chili, salt, chili sauce all in a food processor and grind it to a paste.
4. Slit the tofu open by making 4-5 lines across the tofu and then fill them as deeply as possible without breaking the tofu block but try and hit the bottom.
5. Lightly grease a non-stick pan and then place the tofu and cook until browned, a little charring is quite pleasant so don’t worry.
6. When once side is browned, flip it over and repeat. I usually start with the un-slit side first
7. Drizzle over some of the dressing and serve immediately- you will get the best effects when the tofu is still hot.

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