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Eggless, mushroom and quinoa vegetarian burger

6 Jan

My boy turns three soon and I have been racking my brain for where to take him on his birthday. In fact he will have two days out, one on his birthday with me and one we will all have as a family when his dad returns from Germany. The problem is that the bar is set quite high. Already at three he has had two international holidays and eats out most weekends. Our pre-nursery school days together have been filled with visits to the farm, aerodrome, and kids swimming centre, London markets, butterfly world and the zoo for which we have passes. He’s been to the space centre, IMAX, national history and science museums as well as the aquarium and let’s not touch on the topic of soft play centres or rainforest café-all done. I know there is an element of spoiling him here but the truth is that I am indulging myself in his childhood.

mushroom quinoa burger by Deena kakaya

Turning three is a big deal. It is the birthday before nursery school and now that he has his place we are frequently talking about how exciting that will be. After he is three he will have birthday parties too, with his friends in attendance. Up until now, I have steered away from hosting parties for him as I didn’t want to overshadow the special feelings with the complexities that grown-ups bring to parties. It will all be different next year.

The trouble is that these excursions aren’t cheap and are often sinful for the vegetarian tummy. These days I have been looking out for ideas like the RAF museum in Hendon, which in my opinion is little talked about but utterly impressive (I am not being paid or sponsored to write this). It is a little boy’s paradise with planes hanging off the ceiling and a few accessible for entranced exploration. There were old planes and newer planes and the whole place reminded me of that film, ‘a night at the museum’. We worked up an appetite walking around several buildings full of planes and at lunchtime I ordered from the on-site restaurant a vegetarian burger and some chips for the boy; something I said I would never do (before I had him). The problem was that there was no vegetarian alternative and normally I take his food with us, but it was post-Christmas. Anyway, my burger was a couple of baps with some grilled peppers and courgette tumbling out of it. I could spiral into a discussion about why restaurants don’t do vegetarian food so well, but that would be repetitive wouldn’t it.

The next day, we had another excursion planned with my boy’s cousin, to the national history museum in Tring. This time, I made burgers.

mushroom quinoa burger by Deena kakaya

Now, I have tried innumerate versions of the veggie burger but none have made it onto the blog. Is a burger, ‘special’ enough to blog about? Besides, many of the iterations felt either too; wet, or eggy, dry and crumbly, or just doughy. I simply wanted a burger that’s lean and an option for healthy vegetarian eating but I have been mindful about retaining the moisture and of course it has to have a crisp exterior. Otherwise what would be the point? I like colour and depth and succulence, as all burger lovers do. I am particularly pleased with recipe because I have managed to pack in some quinoa and even some iron-level boosting dried apricots. So, I am sharing with you this burger recipe because it really does the job.

for the full recipe head over to great british chefs

Indian spiced sweet potato filo tart

1 Jan

‘Make sure you switch the Christmas lights off before you go to sleep’. Who would have thought that this line would be enough to fill my eyes?

Indian spiced sweet potato filo tart  by Deena Kakaya

The list of ‘make sure you do’ starts about a week before my husband flies off on his looming foreign business trip and although many people have now presumed that I am used to it and now longer ask how I am, it still makes my heart sink a bit each time there I hear one of the many, concerned reminders.

‘Please don’t stay up too late’ and of course I get the text reminders about locking the doors and not falling asleep on the sofa and a week before he leaves, I listen to the repercussions of missing iron tablets. Every burden and apprehension seems magnified in the silence of the evening, but I’m sitting here with phone in hand and virtually supporting friends who have horrible bosses, kids going through a difficult phase and husbands that just don’t get it. I do sympathise and sincerely want to help. At the same time, I want to remind them that they have jobs, albeit with manager woes. They have the smiles of children filling their hearts, as well as the mental draining that they bring with them and they have a friend that is a husband, even though they may be a long-distance one at time.

It might be easy at times like this to wallow; to sleep erratically, to overthink and to fall quiet. It might be easy to not eat very well, for eating for one isn’t much fun I think. But, I have my little companion don’t I? And the wells dry as I smile through writing this. My best buddy told me today that we should make fresh pesto pasta and he wasn’t kidding. I thought he was but when we finished the dish he exclaimed, ‘mumma thank you, I told you I wanted green pesto pasta’. So we eat well. At just two, he will throughout the day randomly declare his love for me and today he told me, ‘daddy’s gone to America, but you are my best friend and so can we go to borough market’, so I laughed. Because the afternoons are cold we went bowling with friends, and so we talked and I involuntarily chased him around each time he scored and roared in delight. Then we cooked, in a very much collaborative way and eggs are, I realise, fabulous for easy cooking with kids.

This is a light and sweet tart, deep and filling and great for picking and returning to. It’s easy and a soul-soother too. I lightly cooked the sweet potato first with the spices and the result after some time in the oven was sweeter than I expected, but in a really good way. The spices come through wonderfully, but not too strongly and that is a good thing as I know that you will understand if you cook with eggs. Pays to be kind to yourself, doesn’t it.

Indian spiced sweet potato filo tart  by Deena Kakaya

for the full recipe head over to great british chefs

Moroccan Harira meets vegan cottage pie

11 Dec

Moroccan Harira meets vegan cottage pie

They say that travel broadens the mind, but what does that actually mean?

Moroccan style vegan cottage pie by Deena Kakaya

Does it mean that we learn about other cultures and ways of life, new languages, different cuisines or perhaps unfamiliar landscapes and explore intriguing wildlife or flora? Does it mean that we speak to people that we wouldn’t ordinarily speak with and feel their joys, anguishes and reasons for fatigue? Or does it mean that we push ourselves out of a comfort zone and this in itself grows us?

I suppose it depends on not only where you go, but how you travel. Did lying languidly on a Mauritian beach a few years ago broaden my mind in an educational sense? Listening to an ex-prisoner on Robben Island telling us about the rationally differentiated ration card and cutting sun-reflecting limestone in the sun however, left me wondering how forgiving a person I am?

I spent 9 days in Dubai last week. It was my fourth visit and my husband travels frequently for work. In fact, we went to the same resort as we had visited last year when my boy was just a year old. We had decided many years ago that we would never visit the same destination twice, but many things change when you have children.

Moroccan style vegan cottage pie by Deena Kakaya

Dubai is packed full of ex-pats and a myriad of cultures, plethora of cuisines, a whole haze of languages and my eyes blur with the multiple construction sites. It is hot, it is growing and it is has promise. So, what did I learn during my recent travels?

Well, I had a few moments to think whilst my husband fed my boy falafel and green rice in our favourite Lebanese restaurant within the resort. I had just watched, and admired a belly dancer whilst considering whether her body had been augmented and was now listening to the live singer whilst scooping up the most wonderful garlic and herb hummus with fresh balloon bread. My mind wandered off and that I do learn when I am away is that the jurisdictions of possibility are all in my head. Look at the people around me. I made a point of trying to learn the story of as many people I came across in Dubai as I could. The waiter from India who has doubled his salary by moving, didn’t stop at other’s notions of what is inconceivable, the female taxi driver who had escaped a harmful relationship and gained independence had not put limitations on herself either.  The people who yearned for sunlight and sand between their toes, or even just safety…they didn’t stop moving did they?

So from sipping Harira to wanting healthy comfort food at home, here are those two worlds on a plate. Harira is a fragrant with cinnamon and saffron and kind soup that is deep with lentils and gently spiced. This is an oil free recipe and vegan too. I haven’t even used any cheese because it is not needed with those Moroccan essences. I have used the finest sweet potatoes sent to me by Riverford and some of their massive shiny leeks that enhance the light sweetness of this dish.

for the full recipe head over to great British chefs

Home-made Lychee and cinnamon ice-cream

8 Dec

Home-made Lychee and cinnamon ice-cream

You know that feeling when your head swells a little and eyes lose focus…for an instant when you are neither here or there. I am feeling awkwardly poetic as I write this, but you know how there is just a moment, when a surge overcomes you and a sensation that feels so rousing that it sinks and then very quickly elevates your heart.  That is what happened to me today, when I tasted this ice-cream and I have so say, I am pretty proud.

lychee cinnamon ice cream by Deena Kakaya

Imagine. I knew that it would taste good when I was warming the custard base with the cinnamon going through it; it filled the house with festive Christmas essences but really, I didn’t know it would be quite this good. It was almost midnight when I stood at the ice cream maker with a dessert spoon, turned it off and planned to scoop it into a clean tub. But what happened? I had a little taste and then another, then another and now I can feel the cool lychee in my throat and the cinnamon on my skin and let me tell you…mmmm….

I am quite an ice-cream person so the cold weather out there doesn’t put me off. It did my friends who visited last week but when they tasted the star anise and amoretti number, they polished it off saying it was the best ice-cream they had tasted. I blushed, but you know that I love it. Anyway, it’s Christmas and if you are serving ice-cream on the side of a warm pudding or dessert, maybe a chocolate fondant or brownie, then make it this one.


lychee cinnamon 1

I used my froothie, the optimum 400 to blitz together the lychees and grind the cinnamon (not together) and found that there were no clumps of cinnamon or lychee in my ice cream and this is important because clumps of frozen lychee just don’t work because it is such a wet fruit. It is important to achieve a really smooth lychee pulp and this machine does a mighty fine job. I have also used Tesco’s extra thick double cream because the lychees are pretty wet.

Ingredients to serve 4

300ml double cream (I used extra thick double cream)

300ml whole milk

4 egg yolks

1 ½ tsp. of corn flour

200g sugar

1 ¼ tsp. ground cinnamon

250g lychees

Method

  1. Beat the egg yolks, corn flour and sugar until they are smooth and have achieved a pale yellow colour from a deeper, egg-yolk colour.
  2. Warm the milk, cinnamon and cream together until they are just under boiling point, but do not allow them to boil.
  3. Add the milk and cream to the eggs and sugar little by little. Start with a very small amount and gradually build it up, whisking as you go. If you pour too much of the milk and cream in, you could curdle the eggs if they get too hot.
  4. Return the pan to the heat and stir on a gentle flame until the custard has thickened. Check that it is ready by drawing a line on the back of the spatula. If it doesn’t fade out, the custard is ready.
  5. Leave the custard to cool to room temperature and in the meantime, blitz the lychees smooth to a thick juice. There should be no chunks.
  6. Once the custard is at room temperature, mix in the lychees and then refrigerate for about four hours.
  7. Churn the ice cream in your ice cream maker or freeze it overnight. If you are not using an ice cream maker, break up any ice particles with a fork and then refreeze it.

 

Artichoke, two potato and peanut curry

2 Dec

The ritual moaning became a means for bonding, even though we didn’t know it. As we dropped into our workstations on the open floor within our head offices, we compared how horrifically tired we were; too stressed, kids woke up at night or of course the wretched international business travel that we really did not want to do.  Then of course there was the travesty that of the car parking availability and all related discussion around where we ended up parking and having to walk from the north pole of the cark park, in the hideous weather; why don’t we just live abroad.

Artichoke, two potato and peanut curry by Deena Kakaya

We moaned about being underpaid, difficult colleagues, grading systems, ineffective governance systems, oppressive hierarchy, pay differentials, emerging stress related acne, the food in the canteen, the queues at the in-house Starbucks, the lack of available meeting rooms, the air conditioning noise and it was always just too darn cold. The ergonomic chairs weren’t ergonomic enough and the team away day was not in the right location but look, the thing is that we had people to complain to, with.

We confided in each other about fertility issues, we held each other’s hands through tumultuous periods with children. We comforted each other when we worried about the deteriorating health of parents and through illness or even just an argument with a loved one. We gave each other understanding around the challenges of inter-cultural marriages and we saw each other grow and evolve, out of divorce and through to new chapters. From parenting lost children to flourishing ones or from fertility challenges to becoming seasoned parents.

And following the grey clouds of ambiguity that I experienced in recent years, my ex-colleagues, my friends came along to my cookery class yesterday. A couple of them came along to show support and encouragement and each time they caught me around them they would say, ‘Deena I just love this, I am so happy for you.’ ‘Deena this is brilliant, well done you’. It is at this point that I realised how much I had missed them all and missed being around wonderful, like-minded and warm people. I feel so grateful that even after these years, they brought not only this wonderful energy back into my heart but also brought plenty of hellos from other friends.

I felt mellow, easy and I smiled. Fitting with this is my gentle, kind and lightly spiced but very fragrant vegetarian curry of artichoke, two potatoes and peanuts.  As you lift the lid on this curry you smell cinnamon, don’t skip the cinnamon on this one. There are no overpowering flavours, it is subtle yet soothing. Creamy but not with cream; the peanuts add sweet thickness because a paste is added in. The artichoke delivers silky texture and the potatoes sweet depth. The sweet potatoes and potatoes are earthy fresh, smelling of fresh air and good living because that is what the team at Riverford always, always deliver to me.

For the full recipe head over to great british chefs

Hot and spicy mushroom and cauliflower baked giant spring roll with a cheesy spinach layer for a vegetarian Christmas

23 Nov

Hot and spicy mushroom and cauliflower baked giant spring roll with a cheesy spinach layer for a vegetarian Christmas

Hot and spicy mushroom and cauliflower baked giant spring roll with a cheesy spinach layer for a vegetarian Christmas by Deena Kakaya

Before the children in our family came along I was the one who would fire myself up and galvanise all that festive spirit amongst the rest, or at least I tried. I gave impassioned speeches on not letting go of the inner child at Christmas and cherishing those moments in front of the fire (at my house) eating and watching Christmas movies. I love Christmas movies; I love the feel good factor. I love that people in the shops and in the streets are just nicer to each other, ‘because it’s Christmas’.

I would be the one decorating whilst being told how gaudy that tinsel looked and I would ask my husband every single day if he can please, please get the Christmas tree out of its place of hibernation. From secret Santa to games to play for the day; it was all my instigation. But now, there are children and the family no longer need to be shaken into Christmas order by my poetic persuasions. Instead we revel in their squeals and jumping around, as well as the impatience when opening presents or grabbing decorations from the tree. From cute Christmas outfits to running around with wrapping paper there is nothing I want to miss about it. So when the folks from brighthouse asked me to share what my thoughts on having a smooth Christmas when it comes to the menu, I was happy to oblige.

My Christmas menus are purposely simple in nature, but without compromising on that special, indulgent feeling.  The recipe I am sharing with you today embodies one of the most important pieces of advice I carry with me and that is; planning and preparation is everything. I make the stuffing in advance and in fact it tastes better like that as the tingly spicy and power-packed flavours settle into the cauliflower over time. I wilt the spinach ahead of time and grate the cheese. The spring roll pastry defrosts in the fridge overnight and what do I have to do? Just assemble the spring roll, roll it, coat it in oil and bake whilst chucking around wrapping paper with my two year old.

Ingredients to serve 3-4

12-16 sheets of spring roll pastry, thawed

One medium head of cauliflower, cut into florets

200g chestnut mushrooms, sliced

One red onion, sliced

150g of baby leaf spinach, wilted

4-5 handfuls of grated mature cheddar

2 tbsp. sesame oil

2 tsp. Kashmiri chilli powder

1 tsp. cumin powder

1 tsp. minced ginger

1 tsp.

1 tbsp. soy sauce

Salt to taste

2 tbsp. tomato puree

2 tbsp. siracha sauce

Method

  1. Heat the oil in the pan and add the onions, then fry them until they soften.
  2. Introduce the cauliflower and coat with the oil before adding the cumin powder, Kashmiri chilli powder, paprika. Coat the cauliflower well, then mix in the garlic and soy sauce and turn to a lower flame and cook for 4-5 minutes.
  3. Now add the sliced mushrooms, tomato puree and siracha chilli sauce and cook for a further 5 minutes.
  4. Take two sheets of spring roll pastry and towards the end and sides leave an inch sized gap. Place 3-4 dessert spoons of mixture in a line and then roll the spring roll into a tight cigar shape. Seal the end with a little water. Then take another two sheets of pastry, line it with a handful of spinach and some cheese. Place the first spring roll into the cheesy and spinach layer and roll it in the same way, leaving a gap at the bottom and sides. Seal again with water.
  5. Once all of your rolls are made, place them in a preheated oven at 190 degrees until they are lightly golden and crisp.

 

 

 

Sweet corn, Feta and Mango pakora

19 Nov

Sweet corn, Feta and Mango pakora

Is there ever a time which is not emotional or filled with guilt of some sort when you are a parent?

Sweet corn, Feta and Mango pakora by Deena Kakaya

Well, I am embracing (perhaps reluctantly) another emotional time in the life with my two year old sweetheart because we have been viewing nurseries for next year, when he will be old enough to join a proper, actual nursery. Really.

There will be someone else there, to tell him to take his shoes off and listen to his fabulously demonstrative story-telling about planets, squirrels and cars and someone else will be listening to why Neptune is blue and why we can’t go on Mars. There will be animated enacting, I am sure, for all the other children on the bubbling volcanic scenes that make Mars red but my boy’s imaginary friend will be there I hear, but of course. He will play and interact with other little people and I won’t really know them, or be there for any awkward or charming moments. I won’t see his face broaden with that adorable glee upon discovering something new, though he may turn around and say, ‘look mumma’. I will miss the cheeky charm of those moments where he will just grab my head and exclaim, ‘I love you so much mumma; you are a genius’. But this is growth.

Sweet corn, Feta and Mango pakora by Deena Kakaya

So today, I treated my tiny boy with some much requested crunchy, crispy pakora of Indian food influence (vegetarian fritters) with sweet bite of sweet corn, small nuggets of salty feta that oozes when hot and some chewy baked pieces of sunny and happy mango that the folk from Urban fruit sent me. All in all, the sensations left me feeling like another holiday. Alas, sunny treats like these golden and sumptuous pakora must keep me going.

If you are cooking a vegetarian Christmas meal, this is always a crowd-pleaser. If you are not cooking a vegetarian Christmas meal this recipe pleases nonetheless for a tempting and fun starter, canape or side dish.

Ingredients to serve 4-6

175g sweet corn

One large red onion, finely diced

100g feta cheese cut into small cubes

100g baked mango chunks from Urban fruits

1 tsp. cumin seeds

1 tsp. minced ginger

Salt to taste (remember that the feta is salty)

½ tsp. turmeric powder

½ tsp. garam masala

2 green chillies, choppped

100g gram flour

125ml water

Oil for deep frying

Method

  1. Heat the oil on a medium flame.
  2. Combine the sweet corn, red onion, feta with all the spices, salt, chillies and mango chunks and combine well.
  3. Mix in the gram flour and coat all the vegetables, combining well.
  4. Add the water to make a thick batter and then drop a small amount into the oil to check that the oil is hot enough to fry; if the batter sizzles and rises to the surface then add the pakora in small mounds with your fingers, equivalent to the size of a couple of tablespoons of batter.
  5. Fry the pakora until they are golden brown and crisp before removing them onto kitchen paper to absorb any excess oil.
  6. Serve with chutney such as tomato, tamarind or chilli and coriander chutney.

 

 

Deena Kakaya vegetarian cooking class with Natco Foods

28 Oct

Oh my goodness. I am still smiling; the busy London kitchen got hot and steamy. Puffs of clouds lifted and carries the aroma of spices. Banter and laughter mixed with the sounds of sizzling pakora, bubbling curries and tinkles of pots and pans. 

Deena Kakaya vegetarian cooking classes www.deenakakaya.com

A fabulous bunch of people joined us for a cookery class that fused the world together on one vegetarian plate. Each of the recipes was introduced by a demonstration and people worked together to cook up dishes like kale, red onion and banana pakora. We even made cashew cream in the class to use in a curry.

Deena Kakaya vegetarian cooking class www.deenakakaya.com

Some people came in pairs and some came alone. Either way, as the exotic drinks flowed, the group bonded and friendships grew.

Deena Kakaya vegetarian cooking classes www.deenakakaya.com

We ate a lot too. Attendees ate their own cooking, they ate each other’s cooking and of course I had to taste-test too!

Deena Kakaya vegetarian cooking classes www.deenakakaya.com

Deena Kakaya vegetarian cooking class www.deenakakaya.com

Deena Kakaya vegetarian cooking class www.deenakakaya.com

This class was heaving with spice. We sniffed them, tasted them, broke them and ground them. We talked about the health impacts of each of the spices and I shared some personal experiences such as dill water to increase breast milk supply! On the less shocking side we talked about fennel and it helping to clear the tummy, cloves to soothe toothaches and turmeric to fight a cold. All of the spices were fresh and those who came along were able to take some gram flour or spices away with them thanks to our sponsors, Natco

Deena Kakaya vegetarian cooking class www.deenakakaya.com

My favorite bits of every class? Has to be the pride when attendees cook a dish that works, to their own surprise. I enjoy seeing people overcoming fears, such as frying. I delight in the camaraderie that spreads through the room and especially so when people walk out in groups exchanging contact details. I revel in the comments like, ‘I am definitely going to cook this at home’, ‘I am going to treat my friends to this recipe when I host the next dinner party’ and even, ‘I could use this method with other ingredients that I like’.

If you would like to join us for a, hands on, fun and valuable vegetarian cookery class in London then please look out for the next dates on the site or click here

You will walk away with recipes, containers full of food and some experience that you can use in different ways. I am really looking forward to seeing you at a future class. x

Book onto my next class by clicking here

Carrot shrikhand in meringue nests

26 Sep

Carrot shrikhand in meringue nests

Carrots are pretty simple, aren’t they?

I have never really been one to be overly excited about a carrot, not even when it is dunked in the world’s best hummus and I was one of those that drew them to a side at school when they appeared as boiled or soggy sides during forgettable lunch times. I don’t feature them at Christmas and when a health visitor suggested that I wean my boy on boiled sticks of carrot, even I turned my nose. Whilst the foodie world fusses over damsons and aubergines, gelato and burrata here I am, talking to you about, well…carrots.

But, a couple of days ago Riverford sent me a generous bounty of perfectly fragranced and muddy carrots which, when the boy and I finished scrubbing, revealed to be some ultra-orange charms that tasted so sweet that it confused my mind a little. It was the kind of sweetness that you get when you roast a vegetable, you know, delicate but abundant. So then what to do with this princely amount?

Carrot shrikhand in meringue nests by Deena Kakaya

So I did what anyone who needs a question answering does these days, I put it out on social media (yes, let’s all roll our eyes a little at this, but look I haven’t turned to telling my two-year-old son how proud I am of him over Facebook yet, so there is still hope). Anyway, social media responses suggested pickle (I have been thinking of it since so this will follow in due course, with lemon or limes), carrot halwa, carrot cake, and carrot juice…all sounding fab huh?

Given that these carrots hold so much sweetness and colour I am starting ‘mission carrot’ with a sweet dish and that is my beloved Shrikhand.

Carrot shrikhand in meringue nests

Shrikhand is an Indian sweet dish made of strained yoghurt, which when it becomes thick and creamy is sweetened with sugar and then spiced with saffron, rose water, cardamom, pistachio and is so indulgent and lick-worthy. But you know me. I wouldn’t be me if I didn’t fusion-it-up. Behold the carrot Shrikhand that is juicy, creamy, royal-feeling and perfectly naughty on a crisp and airy meringue.

For the full recipe head over to great british chefs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curry for change recipe and video! Black eye bean pakora in coconut kadhi

18 Sep

This is a post that is different to the posts you may be accustomed to seeing from me. Yes there is a recipe, but there is something different.

I was asked a few months ago to share a recipe for the Curry for Change competition, held in conjunction with Natco for the Find your Feet charity. I, like many of you out there get a lot of emails each day but this one caught my attention and held it. I used to be one of those people that was so preoccupied with life that charitable stuff was scheduled in for particular times of the year yet always on the agenda. Since having my boy, my emotional equilibrium has, well, shifted. If you have followed my blog (I thank you once again if you have been) then you will know that during the past few years I have found myself quite lost, confused and in search of that, ‘lifeline’. I have gone without so many aspects of previous life that I felt had defined me, but I can not pretend to know what it is like for people who go without the basics of life; food.

The rawness of the truth for me is that I needed to feel that ‘I CAN’. That I can make a difference for myself, that I can be productive by myself, that I can voice myself once again. It has taken me a few years to find my feet again, and I am trying to imagine how someone who does not have the support, systems, means, facilities, access and options that I have, would find their feet.

So, my recipe was one of the winning recipes for this challenge, as selected by Vivek Singh and I am delighted to share it with you all today. The recipe is for black eye bean pakora in coconut kadhi. This is a sumptuous and soothing dish, filling and versatile and you can make the components ahead of a dinner party and then throw them together at the last minute. The pakora are deep and nutty and full of texture. The little gram flour fritters are lightly spiced and sit in a tangy, spicy and hot yogurt based soup/curry that is tempered with whole spices such as cloves, cinnamon, curry leaves, cumin seeds and ginger. I have used coconut powder to give it a light and fragrant touch. This is perfect for the season and easy to do.

pakora kadhi 1

When our own lives are filled with good food, it’s hard to imagine that one in eight people around the world will go to bed hungry tonight. 

The Find your Feet charity works to support families in Asia and Africa to not got hungry. Not by feeding them, but my helping them find their feet. They support and encourage families to innovate, using their own resources more productively, trying new seeds, making compost and diversifying their crops.

This means they can produce a variety of nutritious foods to eat throughout the year so that they never go hungry and to earn an income by selling the excess.

They provide them with training and support to start village saving and loan schemes so they can borrow a little capital to start a small business.

This allows them to sell their surplus vegetables or eggs or start a small local shop which enables them to become more self-reliant and provide a better future for their family.

They empower women so that they have the confidence to speak out and take a stand on issues that affect them, such as accessing better healthcare for their children or clean water for their village. This in turn enables them to demand what is rightfully theirs. 

Life is so short.

So, what can you do?

 

Well you could hold a curry event at your home or at a friends and ask each person to make a charitable contribution. You cook up a few dishes (you could use this recipe as one) and enjoy yourselves. For every penny your curry event raises, Nacto will match it. The person that raises the most will win a class with Atul Kochhar at his esteemed restaurant, Benares in Mayfair.

 

Here is my recipe and the video that I did, showing how to cook this recipe, for Curry for change.

 

 

Ingredients

For the pakora

60g black eyed beans, pre-soaked overnight

50g finely chopped fenugreek leaves

1 tsp. minced ginger

Salt to taste

½ tsp. chilli powder (or to taste)

1 tsp. amchur powder or the juice of ½ lemon

100ml water

100g gram flour

One medium onion, diced

1 tsp. cumin seeds

Oil for deep frying

For the coconut kadhi

400g plain, natural yoghurt

100g coconut milk powder

650ml water

2 tbsp. gram flour

Salt to taste

2-3 green chillies slit open

1 small stick of cinnamon

2-3 cloves

5-6 curry leaves

1 tsp. minced ginger

2 tbsp. cooking oil

Method

  1. You will need to pre-cook the black eyed beans for about 25=30 minutes until they are tender, then drain any liquid
  2. Heat the oil for deep frying whilst you make the batter for the pakora
  3. To make the pakora firstly lightly mash the black eyed beans. Don’t puree them but with your fingers give them a tender squeeze. The reason for this is to avoid them rolling out of the batter and popping in the oil on their own.
  4. Combine the lightly mashed black eyed beans. Then add the onions, fenugreek leaves and all the dry ingredients and mix them all well before adding all the wet ingredients and mix it all again.
  5. Drop a small amount of batter into the oil to check if the batter sizzles and rises. If it does, then drop in small amounts (roughly 3-4cm sized pieces) into the oil and deep fry until they are crispy and golden brown. Remove them with a slotted spoon, releasing any excess oil, onto kitchen paper.
  6. Turn your attention to making the Kadhi. Mix the coconut milk powder, yoghurt and gram flour to a smooth paste and leave it to side whilst you make the tempering.
  7. In a deep pan, heat the oil and then add the cumin seeds, chillies, curry leaves, cloves and cinnamon. Let them sizzle and then add the minced ginger before you sauté for under a minute, but don’t let the Kadhi brown.
  8. Pour in the yoghurt mixture and the water and bring it all to a simmer before adding salt.
  9. Cook the Kadhi for 7-8 minutes, and then add the pakora and cook for a further 2-3 minutes before serving with hot and steaming rice.

black eyed bean pakora in coconut kadhi

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