Tag Archives: Gujarati

Stuffed Khandvi rolls with slow roasted tomato, garlic and fennel sauce

12 Mar

Stuffed Khandvi rolls with slow roasted tomato, garlic and fennel sauce

Stuffed Khandvi roles by Deena Kakaya

Biting my tongue (shutting my mouth to keep the peace) has not really been one of my strengths over the years. I have grown better at diplomatically responding and not having so much of an emotional response but, shutting my mouth…nope, not really improved in that department. So when people just assume that I get the cooking bug from my mum, it just isn’t true. Sorry mum, I know you read these posts-it gets better don’t worry…read on.

I face timed (is this even a grammatically acceptable term) my folks today to show them what I had made using the new Tefal Ingenio 13 piece induction cookware set that john Lewis sent me. There was much excitement over the handles that just clip on and off from a cleaning and ease of storage perspective but even the weight of them validates quality. I use Tefal non-stick pans in my cookery classes to make tandoori Halloumi and paneer dishes and so this was an especially welcome gift. They asked me to explore more and think of different cookery styles and I thought of my mum, who cooks soul soothing traditional food; her stuffed okra retain shape and colour without ickiness, her potato curry is yellow and gentle rather than heavily smothered in spice and tinned tomatoes and her puri are puffs of pleasure, particularly for my toddler.

The number of pretend arguments that happen in my parent’s living room over Khandvi is just now background noise under the debates about extending the house and that property across the ocean and I recall the efforts to scrape off disaster versions from tin pans. My parents used a lot of tin pans back in the day. But of course it’s all about non-stick these days and given that dad and I both love Khandvi, we have even more reason to make it with reduced risks now.

Khandvi is traditional vegetarian gram flour pasta that is pleasantly sour and lightly spiced. It is silky and thin and make for perfectly gratifying bites of loveliness. When my husband wants to suck up to me, he buys me macaroons or Khandvi. See what I mean?

Stuffed Khandvi rolls by Deena Kakaya

The non-stick pans make for easy Khandvi making- the mixture won’t stick to the pan, when any excess dries, you just peel it off the pan and pop it away (I just eat others eat cake batter). I even used one of the larger frying pans to spread the Khandvi onto.

SO the stuffing; well I have been watching a bit of Indian Masterchef recently (don’t judge me, OK fine do) and they stuffed it with paneer and desiccated coconut. I like this idea and I have created a sauce/chutney that totally lifts the whole experience; slow roasted tomato, garlic, fennel and chilli. I am not sure what the best part of this recipe is, but my goodness they are good.

Ingredients to make approximately 8 rolls

1 cup of plain natural yoghurt

½ cup of gram flour

¼ cup water

1 tsp. minced ginger

Salt to taste

100g paneer, grated

3-4 tbsp. desiccated coconut

3-4 tbsp. finely chopped fresh coriander

For the chutney

225g small cherry or baby plum tomatoes

One bulb of garlic

Salt to taste

2 tsp. fennel seeds soaked in warm water

3-4 fat red bullet chillies

For the tempering

2 tbsp. sesame oil

5-6 curry leaves

2-3 green chillies

Method

  1. Start by slow roasting the tomatoes and garlic on 150 degrees, for approximately 45 minutes. Make sure the tomatoes are all cut side up before you roast them and then drizzle them very lightly in rapeseed oil. Once the tomatoes have cooled to room temperature, blitz them smooth with the chillies, garlic, and fennel seeds and salt. Leave the paste to a side.
  2. To make the Khandvi, combine the gram flour, yoghurt and water in a mixing bowl and beat it until the lumps are softened and removed. Add the minced ginger and salt. Then pour the mixture into a non-stick saucepan (on a low flame) and with a spatula, mix it circular motions until it starts to leave the sides. You can check if it is ready by spreading a small amount onto the side of a non-stick pan and if, after it cools it can be peeled away then it is ready. Once the mixture is ready, work quickly by spreading thin lengths with a wide spatula onto the non-stick surface. Once it has cooled, spread the paste onto it, thinly. Next sprinkle a thin layer of paneer, desiccated coconut and finish off with coriander. Cut even sized lengths (mine were 3-4 inches wide) and then carefully roll them
  3. To make the tempering, heat the oil and add the mustard seeds, curry leaves and chillies and once the seeds pop and a perfume of the curry leaves is released then turn the heat off. Evenly drizzle the tempering onto the Khandvi.

 

Za’atar aubergines and toasted pine nuts on silky hummus

2 Oct Za'atar aubergines and toasted pine nuts on silky hummus

Za’atar aubergines with toasted pine nuts on silky hummus

Za'atar aubergines and toasted pine nuts on silky hummus

Za’atar aubergines and toasted pine nuts on silky hummus

Great things can happen, both in life and food, completely by accident…or rather in an unplanned or coincidental fashion. For example, today whilst putting my boy to sleep I thought of my regular Chinese restaurant, then of Navratri (hindu festival which involves nine nights of dancing) following which I realised I hadn’t made one of the Gujarati classics that I’m pretty darn good at doing, in a while. All of these thoughts inspired the creation a weird but outrageously good new soup recipe which I will soon share.

Back to this recipe, which is also unpremeditated. My parents came to stay last week when my husband was in Moscow for work. They, besides enjoying time with my boy and I, were so helpful in the kitchen. My dad was my kitchen assistant.
They have a habit of overcooking and under eating. They have also started to use a tongue-swelling level of chilli in their cooking, which I can no longer endure. During my late pregnancy I developed intolerable reflux so I cut the chilli and since then I never really reintroduced it. Anyway, they’re a bit obsessed with aubergines, my folks. They cooked thick slithers of fresh and slippery Aubergine in oil, without water and lots of indian spices but no tomatoes. Such a simple and garlicky dish.

I don’t know why I was reluctant to try it, but when I did I actually really enjoyed it. But then the chilli kicked in and in the absence of cooling yoghurt I grabbed the hummus. And thats how this recipe happened.

Za’atar spice is a tangy and herbaceous spice blend with a thyme like flavour. The tanginess comes from sumac, which is made from dried fruits. The za’atar spice blend also contains nutty sesame seeds and aromatic cumin. It’s fairly delicate so I like to let it sing for itself rather than mix it in with other powerful flavours. Simple is best with spice blends like za’atar.

This is no word of an exaggeration, this hummus is probably the best I have made. Nothing sexy; it’s a simple, smooth and silky hummus. It’s really good though. This is why I’ve allowed for a batch for your fridge, it’ll keep for about 3 days.

Ingredients to serve four

One large Aubergine, cut into 2 inch slithers
4-5 shallots,sliced
1 1/2 tbsp za’atar spice
3 tsp lemon juice
A handful of pine nuts, dry toasted on a non-stick pan
2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

For the hummus

2 cans of cooked chickpeas
4 tbsp lemon juice
7 tbsp of ice cold water
4 cloves of garlic, minced
1 cup tahini
1 1/2 tsp salt

Method.

1. Heat 3 tbsp of cooking oil in a non stick pan and add the onions and garlic and sauté for a couple of minutes
2. Add the aubergines and mix well. Stir in the za’atar spice blend and the lemon juice. Turn the heat to a very low flame and cook for about 20minutes or until the Aubergine is soft enough to pierce through, but not until they lose shape or become squashed.
3. To make the hummus put the chickpeas into a food processor and blitz until they are a coarse paste.image
4. Add the tahini, garlic, salt and lemon juice and then blitz again.
5. Whilst the food processor is doing its thing, slowly pour in the water and it should loosen up to a lovely consistency.

To serve, top the hummus with the cooked Aubergine whilst they are still warm and when the pine nuts. Serve with flatbread or pitta bread. Don’t forget to tell me how you enjoyed this recipe!

Spicy Rice Flour Dough Balls (My Very Popular Khichi)

31 Jan

Spicy Rice Flour Dough Balls (My Very Popular Khichi)

Hot summer days during the school holidays, mother and aunties (in the broader sense, meaning women of mum’s age) in the kitchen boisterous and rosy. The wooden fence between us and the neighbours has been worn down to stubble from ever frequent visits by the neighbours kids indelicately climbing over them and aunties leaning over the fence, chit-chatting languidly after a hard day’s work.

The kitchen was spicy-steamy even though the windows and doors were wide open; the gleeful kids were darting between kitchen and garden. My mum would pick the hottest and least breezy days to make rice flour poppadum’s and I was the contented assistant; these goings-on were tradition for summer holidays. Mum and aunts simmered the chillies and spices in hot water leaving us all coughing, before adding the flour to make dough. It’s OK; we had strawberries and fresh fruit juices to distract our throats. They rolled the oiled dough to poppadum shapes; just a couple of millimetres thick and it was my starring role to lay them onto cleaned (but unwanted) wafting saris in the garden.  I collected heavy stones and bricks, full of purpose in my loud yellow and green floral dresses, to ensure the saris were controlled and I lay the papdi (the particular variety of poppadum) neatly, not overlapping them.   Barefoot in on the summer garden slabs, I enjoyed the heat under my feet.  I’d find a shady spot to intermittently paint under, whilst I safeguarded the poppadum’s from birds and insects too, or maybe it was the Bollywood music booming (and women singing) from the kitchen that did that!

The plan was to let the sun dry the dough out completely. Once dried out and microwaved or fried they taste impressively crunchy and crispy. They are deeper and slightly chewier than the poppadums you will find in restaurants, but they remain my favourite variety.  The smooth and slippery dough itself is delectably Moorish. When steamed its spongy, a little chewy, overflowing with punch and undeniably gutsy. Funnily enough the steamed dough is often eaten as a snack, with a little oil that’s infused with salt and chilli powder. Greasy fingers are typically all that remain once a plate of these gently green balls are served. Try it; tell me how you like it.

Khichi

Deena’s Spicy Rice Flour Dough Balls; My Very Popular Kichi

Ingredients

3-4 green chillies, minced

800ml of water

1 ½ tsp. of cumin seeds

1 tsp. of carom seeds/ajwain

Salt to taste

½ tsp. of ground cinnamon

375g of rice flour

Method serves 4-5

  1. Pour the specified amount of water into a deep pan, before adding the spices and seasonings with the minced chillies and bring it to a gentle simmer. Turn the heat down and continue to simmer for 3-4 minutes
  2. Take a long wooden spoon and gently pour in the rice flour and beat into the water, avoiding clumps forming. Do this quickly, before removing the dough from the heat
  3. Pour the dough into a large plate and grease your palms. Form flattened balls of about 5-6cm diameter and dip your thumb in the centre to create a well (keep the well empty though) and then steam for about 15 minutes.
  4. Remove onto a plate and serve with oil infused with chilli powder and salt.
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