Tag Archives: stuffed curry

Stuffed Brussels sprouts curry

4 Dec

This is my dad’s recipe and it is unconventional in way, but then that’s normal isn’t it.

http://www.greatbritishchefs.com/community/stuffed-brussels-sprouts-curry-recipe by Deena Kakaya

I remember my ‘aunties’ (relatives and family friends and of my mum’s generation, not just actually related aunties) would vociferously express how lucky my mum was because my dad could, and would cook. The words were complimentary, the tone and body language almost mocking and most definitely harsh. In those days, it was just less common for men of my dad’s age to cook and if they did, it was pretty limited to a liberally spiced, hefty chicken dish perhaps because it was an adventure or because the wife was vegetarian.

My dad though, just cooked. He cooked Indo-Chinese food, samosa-mix lasagna, curry-pies and just curries. He cooked adventurous fusion curries and humble dhal and my mum’s favorite okra Kadhi, knowing her cravings without her saying. All the curious recipes came with lashings of passion and a sprinkle of smugness. Even the neighbour bellowed to my scurrying mum as she returned from work, ‘your husband has been cooking for you, you are so lucky’, but she would only lift the lid on the pans when my mum was there.

She is lucky isn’t she, my mum. She has a husband who is a team mate. Though I do think that in those days, the definition of being lucky might have been to swing on a garden hammock in the hot climates that her friends had married within and grown old and fat into, with a maid oiling her hair and another sweeping the floors. Perhaps an afternoon’s nap, as is the norm over there and a few kids running around. The sexism of those days was to see how lucky my smiling and hardworking mum was, but not to see the fact that she was also standing shoulder to shoulder with her husband. Unconventional at the time but now, in hindsight I see that even I was pretty lucky.

This is my dad’s vegetarian (and this is relevant) recipe for stuffed Brussels sprouts curry and it is pretty much one of the very few ways in which I will eat Brussels sprouts. The stuffing is easy to make and the only slightly fiddly bit is stuffing the sprouts but it is pretty quick to do. The little layers of the sprouts soak up the spices from the stuffing and the gravy and the gram flour in the stuffing makes the curry gravy thick and nutty. Just don’t overcook the sprouts and they are gorgeously giving.

for the full recipe head over to great british chefs 

http://www.greatbritishchefs.com/community/stuffed-brussels-sprouts-curry-recipe by Deena Kakaya

Deena’s Stuffed Okra

27 Nov

As a child I used to diligently peel back the layers in quarter-sections lengthways, and then nibble at them one by one. Only then, with a scoop of chapatti, would I eat the stuffing of that individual okra, with a warm, smug glow of self satisfaction. And then repeat the process. My tailored technique did slow down mealtimes, but personally I think my parents were just pleased that I was eating something green: and that okra too! We didn’t know many other kids who would eat them, at least not as happily as I did. In fact I remember one of my cousin’s being close to tears when encouraged to be sensible and eat their portion….”Deena does?” This made me feel like a very sophisticated little kid – did I have good taste or was it just that I was more willing to try? I revelled in my mother’s cheerful flaunting of this fact to my aunts as well as her friends. “She eats okra you know! In fact it’s one of her favourite meals and she even eats an extra chappati when we have this particular curry”. Parents! Kids! In fact, I think stuffed okra was indeed one of my favourite curries. Sometimes I would just roll it whole in the middle of a chapatti and then have a mighty mouthful. They’re quite a fun vegetable to eat you know. Why is this exquisite curry not served in restaurants?
 
It was, and still is, especially important to me that they sit in a mild, but pretty garlicky curry base. Not watery, but thick and happy. A luscious coating shall we say. Enough to add a tang of tomato, but I don’t want them drenched; no that would be awful. And I certainly can’t have them sticky-that’s neglectfully tragic. Simmer gently on a light flame, don’t rush.

I adore the way they are stacked in the Indian grocers, mounds and mounds of ladies fingers. I’ve always found that name so off-putting. Long green bullets being bent and scraped by scanning, analytical grocery shoppers. I’m always amused by the conversations around okra stands…people run their fingers like pensive ploughs over and through them, tutting and clicking their tongues; a distinct sign that they are unimpressed. Not woody, not browned. Green and slender, that’s how they should be…that’s what they’re discussing, scattered amongst talk of daughter-in-laws and mother-in-laws.
 
I’ve experienced okra diversely, cooked in soups, Gujarati yogurt soups (kadhi), African stews, American-style breaded and fried, stir fried with sugar and then there’s the shredded and fried variety as found in Mumbai. I’ve tasted them in a ratatouille and also stir fried in soy sauce and chili. Nevertheless, one of the okra recipes that sits closest to my heart is this one.
 
Although the traditional recipe calls for the stuffing being bound with oil, I simply can’t bring myself to do it. My father and I have regular enthused discussions about this. He buys into the idea and will go along with it, but pushes my version of this stuffing, which is slightly stickier, in my direction… “You do it”. So here is how I do it;

Stuffed Okra Curry by Deena Kakaya

Ingredients

250g of okra
6 tbsp of gram flour
2 tbsp of corriander powder and 1 tsp of cumin powder
salt to taste
3 tsp of lemon juice
1/2 tsp turmeric
2 tbsp of vegetable oil
2tbsp of water for the stuffing and 1/2 cup hot water for the curry base.
Chili powder to taste, I use about 2 tsp
1/2 can of plum peeled tomatoes
1-2 chilies
2-3 cloves of garlic finely chopped
1/2 tsp mustard seeds
 
Method
 
1. Wash the okra and dry them individually with kitchen paper and then leave the to stand and dry completely.  This will help to avoid that gunky texture.
2. Toast the gram flour gently for about 1-2 minutes, but dont let the gram flour burn
3. Combine the gram flour, cumin powder, corriander powder, salt and turmeric and mix thoroughly
4. Add the oil, lemon juice and water to the spices mix and form a dough.
5. When the okra are dry, create a slit vertically from top to tail in the centre of the okra but avoid touching the bottom and top tips. 
6. Stuff them each generously and close them firmly.
7. In a deep set pan, heat a splash of oil and add the mustard seeds and allow them to pop.  Stir in the chopped garlic and chili and saute until golden, before mixing in the tomato and salt. Bring this to a simmer and then place the okra in gently.
8. Coat the okra with the mixture gently and simmer on a low flame for about 5 minutes before adding 1/2 cup of hot water.  Bring to a simmer again and cook on a medium flame until the okra are soft enough to pierce all the way through.  This should take about 15 minutes.
 
I suggest devouring these okra with lots of natural yogurt of raitha and hot buttery chappati’s or naan bread. 

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